Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/34

Click to flip

34 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
You have a computer running windows 7 Enterprise.

The C: drive holds all system files and is the boot volume. The D: volume holds only user data files.

You want to create a system image backup that includes both the C: and D: drives. You will save the backup to an external disk and archive it in case you need to recover your system.

What should you do?
- In the Backup and Restore console, configure a system image backup.
- In the Backup and Restore console, create a system repair disc.
- In the Backup and Restore console, create a scheduled backup.
- In Windows Task Scheduler, create a task to run 'wbadmin'.
- In the Backup and Restore console, configure a system image backup.

Explanation
Create a system image backup in the Backup and Restore console. The system image backup creates a single backup that includes the system volume(s) plus any additional volumes you select.

Create scheduled backups in the Backup and Restore console to save user files, specify volumes or directories, and/or an image of the system volume(s) plus any additional volumes you select.

Create scheduled backups in the Backup and Restore console to save user files, specify volumes or directories, and/or an image of the system volume(s) on a regular schedule. When you schedule a backup, the system image backup included with the backup only includes the system volumes. While you can back up additional volumes, you cannot include those volumes in the system image backup.

Use the Task Scheduler to create a task to perform backups on a schedule. You would use Task Scheduler instead of the Backup and Restore console if you wanted to run backups more than once a day, week, or month. A system repair disc is used to boot the computer if something prevents it from starting. the system repair disc does not include data backups, but is used in conjunction with data backups to restore your system if necessary.

Section 8.1
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

The computer has two hard drives, both formatted with NTFS. you have enabled System Restore on both disks.

You want to delete all restore points except for the last restore point.

What should you do?
- Edit the system Protection settings in System Properties.
- Run System Restore.
- Run backup and Restore.
- Run Disk Cleanup.
- Run Disk Cleanup.

Explanation
Use Disk Cleanup to delete all but the last restore point. In Disk cleanup, click the 'Clean up system files' button, then use the 'More Options' tab to delete older restore points.

Edit System Protection settings in System Properties to delete all existing restore points, or to remove system protection from a drive (which deletes all restore points). Use System Restore to restore to a restore point (you cannot delete restore points within System Restore). Run Backup and Restore to back up the computer or user files, or to initiate a restore.

Section 8.3
You manage a computer that runs Windows 7.

As part of your regular system maintenance, you install the latest operating system updates.

After several days, you notice that the system locks up and reboots from time to time. You suspect that a recent update is causing the problem. You want to restore the computer to its previous state before the updates as quickly as possible.

What should you do?
- Restore the system using a system image.
- Reboot the computer using the Last Known Good configuration.
- Use the Previous Versions feature for the system disk.
- Restore the system using a restore point.
- Restore the system using a restore point.

Use System Restore to reset your computer's configuration to a point in time when the operating system was stable. System restore rolls back operating system configuration settings, drivers, and applications, but does not affect user data files.

Restoring to a system image would work, but would take more time than using a restore point. Use Previous Versions to restore previous versions of files, such as to revert back to a version of a file that you have modified.

Use the last Known Good configuration to undo changes that have occurred since the last successful boot, and which prevent the user from logging on. Once you have logged on after making the changes, Last Known Good will not help in resolving the problem.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running windows 7 enterprise.

The computer has two volumes: C: and D:.

You want to schedule backup jobs of the C: volume to include all user files and a system image of the C: volume.

You want to configure the backup job and the schedule with a minimal amount of effort.

What should you do?
- Use Device Manager.
- Add the 'wbadmin' command to a batch file.
- Use the windows Task Scheduler.
- Use the Backup and Restore console.
- Use the Backup and Restore console.

Explanation
You can use the Backup and Restore console to create a system image backup, a scheduled backup of files and folders, and a system repair disc. By default, file backups occur every Sunday at 7:00 pm. You can modify the schedule using the Backup and Restore console. However, there is only one scheduled backup with a single set of settings.

By itself, you can use the 'wbadmin' command to create a system image backup, but you cannot schedule the backup unless you also save the 'wbadmin' command to a batch file and then use Windows Task Scheduler. Use Windows Task Scheduler to schedule a batch file. Use Device manger to mange hardware devices.

Section 8.1
You have a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate.

You want to use the Backup and Restore console to back up all user files on the computer. You want to include a system image in the scheduled backup.

To ensure you have space for all of the user files and the system image, you install a new 360 GB internal hard drive, boot the computer, and initialize the drive in Disk Management using MBR.

When you run the Backup and Restore console, you cannot include a system image during the backup job.

What should you do?
- Create the 'Backup Set' folder on the new drive.
- Format the new drive with NTFS.
- Format the new drive with FAT32.
- Initialize the disk using GPT.
- Format the new drive with NTFS.

Explanation
You need to format the new drive with the NTFS file system. System image backups can only be saved to NTFS-formatted volumes. System image backups will be disabled if the destination volume is not formatted with NTFS.

You do not create the 'Backup Set' folder manually. The 'Backup Set' folder is created for file backups, and is found in the root of the backup destination. Reinstalling the new drive will not produce different results when you run the Backup and Restore console.

Section 8.1
You have a computer that runs windows 7.

The computer has two hard dries, both formatted with NTFS. You have enabled System Restore on both disks.

You want to delete all restore points, but still be able to make new restore points for both drives.

What should you do?
- Open System Restore and select all the restore points to delete.
- Run Disk Cleanup and clean up system files.
- Edit the System Protection settings in System Properties and delete the restore points.
- Edit the System Protection settings in System Properties and turn off protection for both drives.
- Edit the System Protection settings in System Properties and delete the restore points.

Explanation
Edit the System Protection settings in System Properties to delete all existing restore points. Deleting restore points using the Delete feature keeps system protection enabled on the disks. Disabling system protection also deletes all restore points, but removes system protection from the disks.

use Disk Cleanup to delete all but the last restore point. use System Restore to restore a restore point (you cannot delete restore points within System Restore).

Section 8.3
You have a computer that runs windows 7.

The computer has two hard drives. The C: drive is the system drive, and the D: drive holds data files.

You perform a system image backup using the Backup and Restore console that includes both drives. Your computer takes regular restore point snapshots.

one day you find the D:\finances folder has been deleted. You check the previous versions for the drive, but find nothing listed.

You need to restore the folder and its contents as quickly as possible.

What should you do?
- Mount the .vhd file in the backup, then copy the folder to the drive.
- In the Backup and Restore console, choose 'Restore my files'. Browse to and restore the folder.
- Revert the system to restore point prior to the folder being deleted.
- Restart the computer from the installation disc and restore the system from the system image backup.
- Mount the .vhd file in the backup, then copy the folder to the drive.

Explanation

You can restore individual files and folders from a system image backup by mounting the .vhd file in Disk Management, and then using explorer to browse to and copy the file or the folder. This is faster than doing a complete system image restore.

Restoring to a restore point does not revert to previous versions of files. Instead, use the 'Previous Versions' tab to restore to previous versions of files or folders. The 'Restore my files' option only recovers files that are part of scheduled backups; it cannot be used to restore individual files or folders from a system image backup or system image. Because you do not see previous versions listed for the drive, you can assume that restore points are not enabled for the drive. In addition, file backups do not have a copy of the folder because those copies would be listed on the Previous Versions tab, even if restore points had not been enabled.

Section 8.2
You have a computer running Windows 7 Home Premium. The computer has a single hard drive.

You want to use the Backup and Restore console to schedule regular backups. Backups will include all user data files and a system image backup. You want the backups to run unattended.

What should you do?
- Choose a CD/DVD drive as the backup destination.
- Choose an external hard drive as the backup destination.
- Choose the system drive as the backup destination.
- Choose a network share as the backup destination.
- Choose an external hard drive as the backup destination.

Explanation
use an external hard disk drive as the destination for the backup. If there is sufficient space and if the external hard disk drive is connected to the computer, the Backup and Restore console will run the scheduled backup and create a system image each time. When using the Backup and Restore, a system image is created by default if the destination location has enough disk space.

Windows 7 Home Premium does not support scheduled backups to a network destination; only Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate can schedule system and file backups to a network. Using the CD/DVD drive as the destination for scheduled backups will not allow you to run the backup unattended. The backup destination disk must be different than the source disk. In other words, you cannot back up files on a disk and save the backup to the same disk.
You have a computer running windows 7 Enterprise.

The C: drive holds all system files and is the boot volume. The D: volume holds only user data files.

You want to schedule a backup that includes everything on the C: and D: drives so you could restore your entire computer if necessary. You want the backup to run on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

What should you do?
- In Windows Task Scheduler, create a task to run 'wbadmin'.
- In the Backup and Restore console, create a system repair disc.
- In the Backup and Restore console, configure a system image backup.
- In the Backup and Restore console, schedule a file backup.
- In Windows Task Scheduler, create a task to run 'wbadmin'.

Explanation
If you need to schedule backups to occur more than once a week, use the Task Scheduler to create a task that runs 'wbadmin'. You can schedule backups that include all files on a drive or a system image, but you can only schedule the backup to occur once every day, week, or month. To perform the backup more than once a day, week, or month, use the Task scheduler.

With a system image backup in the Backup and Restore console, you can include other volumes besides the system volumes. However, you cannot schedule the backup. A system repair disc is used to boot the computer if something prevents it from starting. The system repair disc does not include data backups, but is used in conjunction with data backups to restore your system if necessary.

Section 8.1
You have a computer that runs windows 7.

You have recently made some changes to your system. Things seemed to run fine for several days.

Today, your computer has started to be unstable. Shortly after logging on, the system crashes and hangs.

Which of the following will most likely correct the problem in the least amount of time?
- Boot into Safe Mode and restore to a restore point.
- Boot to the installation disc and use Startup Repair.
- Boot to the installation disc and use System Image Recovery.
- Boot using the Last Known Good configuration.
- Boot into Safe Mode and restore to a restore point.

Explanation
Try restoring the system to a restore point. System changes made since the restore point was taken are undone. Applications, device drivers, and patches will no longer be applied.

Using a restore point is faster than trying other recovery options from the installation disc. Restoring the entire system would only be necessary if a restore point does not work.

Because the problem occurs after a successful logon, the Last Known Good (LKG) option will not help. Use LKG if the problem occurred following a hardware change and before your next logon.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

The computer has the following drives:

* C: (system drive with user profiles)
* E: (Data files)
* F: (External USB hard drive)

You enable System Protection on the C: drive. You also schedule regular backups with the following settings:

* Back up all user libraries
* Back up the C: and E: drives
* Include a system image
* Save the backup to the F: drive

Last night the E: drive crashed. You need to restore the data files found in the E: drive.

What should you do?
- Use the 'Previous Versions' tab on the files' or folder's properties to restore the data.
- Use the Backup and Restore console to restore data from backup.
- Attach a system image, and use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the files form the image.
- Run System Restore and use a restore point to restore the data.
- Use the Backup and Restore console to restore data from backup.

Explanation
Use the Backup and Restore console to restore the data from backup. the Backup and restore console can restore all of the data from the backup files.

Because the drive crashed, you cannot access the files and folders, and therefore cannot use the 'Previous Versions' tab to restore the data. When you include a system image in a scheduled backup, only the boot and system partitions are included in the backup (an image of the E: drive is not included in the scheduled backup). Restore points include shadow copies of user data files on protected volumes. However, restoring to a restore point will not restore or modify user data files.

Section 8.2
You have a computer running windows 7 Ultimate.

To protect your data from loss or corruption, you enable System Protection on all drives in your computer. You also schedule regular backups with the following settings:

* Back up all user libraries
* Back up all drives
* Include a system image

Today you notice that your user prof8ile settings are corrupt.

You need to restore the user profile settings with the least amount of effort.

What should you do?
- Attach a system image, and use Windows explorer to browse to and then copy the file from the image.
- Run system Restore and use a restore point to restore the data.
- Use the Backup and Restore console to restore the user profile form backup.
- Use the 'Previous Versions' tab on the files' or folder's properties in the user profile.
- Use the Backup and Restore console to restore the user profile form backup.

Explanation
The Backup and Restore console can restore all of the user profile settings from the backup files.

Using the system image or previous versions to restore the user profiles will work, but requires too much work. Restore points include shadow copies of user data files on protected volumes. However, restoring to a restore point will not restore or modify user data files.

Section 8.2
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

The computer has the following tow volumes:

* The C; drive is the system drive with user profiles and individual user files
* The D: drive holds data files common to all users

You take the following actions:

* You schedule regular backups to back up all user libraries. The scheduled backup includes the entire D: drive, as well as a system image.
* You use System Restore to take a snapshot.

After working with a file on the D; drive, you accidentally delete most of the data in the file. You need to recover the file as it existed before you made the changes.

You check the System Protection settings and find that system protection is not enabled for the D: drive.

Using the least amount of effort, you must restore the data in the file.

What should you do?
- Use the 'Previous Versions' tab of the file properties to restore the file.
- Restore the system using the system image.
- Run System Restore and restore to the restore point.
- Attach the system image and use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the file form the image.
- Use the 'Previous Versions' tab of the file properties to restore the file.

Explanation
Use the 'Previous Versions' tab of the file properties to restore the file. Previous versions of files that are included in a scheduled backup appear on the 'Previous Versions' tab for the file, even if System Protection has not been enabled for the drive. When you view the previous versions, you will see that earlier versions of the file exists in a backup and not a snapshot. You can also use the Backup and restore console to browse to and restore the file.

When you create a scheduled backup that includes a system image, only the boot and system partitions are included int he image, so the version of the file will not exist in the system image backup. Restoring to a restore point restores system settings but does not affect files. In addition, because system protection is not enabled for the drive, restoring to the restore point will not affect the D: drive.

Section 8.2
You have a laptop computer running Windows 7 Ultimate.

The computer has a single 20 GB internal hard drive and an optical drive. The internal hard drive has a single volume which currently takes all of the disk space.

You want to sue the Backup and Restore console to create a scheduled backup that includes all user files and system image.

You purchase and attach a 30 GB USB flash drive to the computer.

When you run the Backup and Restore console, you select the flash drive as the backup destination. however, you cannot configure the settings to include a system image during the backup.

You want to configure the scheduled backup to include a system image with the least amount of effort.

What should you do?
- Use the optical drive as the backup destination.
- Manually create a system image backup using the USB flash drive as the destination.
- Format the USB flash drive with NTFS.
- Purchase and attach an external USB hard disk.
- Purchase and attach an external USB hard disk.

Explanation
In this case, you should purchase an external USB hard disk drive and use it as the destination drive.

USB flash devices and optical drives cannot include a system image using scheduled backups. USB flash devices cannot be used for a system image backup, while optical drives can be used for a manual system image backup.

Section 8.1
You have a computer that runs Windows 7 Professional.

In the Backup and Restore console, you create a backup job that includes all user data files and a system image. The backup runs successfully for several weeks.

You decide that you want the backup to run twice a week. You need to use the least amount of effort possible.

What should you do?
- Keep the existing schedule, manually perform an additional backup once a week.
- Edit the task in the Task Scheduler.
- Edit the backup schedule in the Backup and Restore console.
- Edit the System Restore properties in the Advanced settings.
- Edit the task in the Task Scheduler.

Explanation
With the Backup and Restore console, you can schedule backups once a day, once a week, or once a month. To modify this schedule, edit the task in the Task Scheduler. When you create a backup job in the console, a task is created automatically.

Performing a manual backup would require more effort than allowing the task schedule to perform the backup automatically.

Section 8.1
You have a computer running windows 7 Professional.

To protect your data form loss or corruption, you enable System Protection on all the drives in your computer. You also schedule regular backups of the system drive and all other drives using the Backup and Restore console.

After working with a file, you notice that you accidentally deleted most of the data. You need to restore the file to the point in time before you modified it.

What should you do? (Select two. Each answer is an independent solution.)
- Use the file properties to restore a previous version of the file.
- Run System Restore and use a restore point to restore the data.
- Use Windows Explorer to browse the 'Backup Set' folder and then copy the file.
- Use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the file from a .vhd file.
- Use the file properties to restore a previous version of the file.
- Use Windows Explorer to browse the 'Backup Set' folder and then copy the file.

Explanation
To restore the data in this scenario, you can:

* Edit the file properties and use the 'Previous Version' tab to use shadow copies or file backups.
* Use Windows Explorer to browse the 'Backup Set' folder and then copy the file. The 'Backup Set' folder is created for file backups, and is found in the root of the backup destination. The files are stored in a .zip file.

Restore points include shadow copies of user data files on protected volumes. However, restoring to a restore point will not restore or modify user data files. To restore files form a .vhd file, you must first attach the .vhd file, then you can use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the file form the .vhd file.

Section 8.2
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

You install the drivers to connect your new PDA to the computer. Immediately following the device installation, you get a bluescreen error. You reboot the computer but it shows the same error before the boot process completes.

You need to start the computer using the least amount of effort.

What should you try first?
- Reboot the system using Last Known Good Configuration from the Advanced Startup options.
- Reboot the system to the installation disc. Restore to a restore point.
- Reboot the system to the installation disc. Perform a restore form a system image.
- Reboot the system into Safe Mode. Restore to a restore point.
- Reboot the system using Last Known Good Configuration from the Advanced Startup options.

Explanation
Because a successful logon has not occurred since the bluescreen errors began, you can use the Last Known Good Configuration (LKG) option. The new driver that is causing the boot problem will no longer be used.

Restoring to a restore point or to a complete system image might be necessary if Last Known Good doesn't work, but you should try LKG first as this is a fast recovery method.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

The computer has the following two volumes:

* The C: drive is the system drive with user profiles and individual user files
* The D: drive holds data files common to all users

You take the following actions:

* You create a system image backup that includes both the C: and D: drives.
* You schedule regular backups to back up all user libraries. The scheduled backup includes a system image.
* You use System Restore to take a snapshot.

You edit and save a file on the D: drive. You decide that you don't like the changes and want to revert to a previous version of the file.

You go to the 'Previous Versions' tab of the file and see nothing listed. You need to restore the previous version of the file.

What should you do?
- Use the Backup and Restore console to browse for the file from the scheduled backup.
- Enable system Protection on the D: drive.
- Restore the system to the restore point.
- Restore the file form the system image.
- Restore the file form the system image.

Explanation
In this scenario, the only option to get the file back is to use the copy of the file included in the system image backup. Using the system image is the only possible answer that will get the file back. However, instead of restoring to the system image, you should mount the system image and browse to the file you want to restore.

Any file included in a snapshot will show on the 'Previous Versions' tab. Because the file does not show, system protection is likely not enabled for the D: drive. Enabling system protection will help you recover previous versions in the future, but will not help you get back the previous version of the file. Restoring to a restore point restores system settings but does not affect files. Use Previous Versions (if available) to revert to earlier version of a file.

Any file included in a scheduled backup will show on the 'Previous Versions' tab Because the file does not show, the scheduled backups do not include the file (i.e. backups do not include data on the D: drive). If the file does not show on the Previous Versions tab, it will also not exist when browsing using the Backup and Restore console.

Section 8.2
You have a computer that runs Windows 7 Professional. The computer has a single hard drive.

You have scheduled regular backups of the computer to include everything on the hard drive. The backups are stored on a network shared folder.

You need to make a full backup of the computer right now.

What should you do?
- Use a USB flash drive as the backup destination.
- Select a different network location as the backup destination.
- Select the CD/DVD drive as the backup destination.
- install a second internal hard drive; select the hard drive as the backup destination.
- Select the CD/DVD drive as the backup destination.

Explanation
When you select a CD/DVD drive as the backup destination, the 'Create new, full backup' options becomes available. You can click this link to manually create a full backup at any time.

Windows takes a full backup the first time the computer is backed up. Subsequent backups back up only the changed data. Windows will automatically take a full backup periodically when needed during the scheduled time. The only way to manually create a full backup is to store the backup to CD/DVD.

Section 8.1
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

Although the system drive has plenty of disk space, you add an internal hard drive to increase storage for user files.

For the past several weeks you have created and changed many files stored on the new hard drive.

You want to revert a specific file to a previous version. however, after viewing the file properties, you notice that no previous versions are available.

You must ensure that you can revert files to previous versions on the new hard drive.

What should you do?
- Enable System Protection for the new hard drive.
- Delete all but the last restore point.
- Create a restore point.
- Restore the system from a restore point.
- Enable System Protection for the new hard drive.

Explanation

You must enable System Protection settings on the new drive. By default, System Protection settings are enabled on the system drive, but must be enabled on other drives. When enabled, the System Protection settings determine what type of files can be restored from previous versions.

Creating a restore point will create previous versions of files only on drives which have System Protection enabled. Backing up the system drive does not create previous versions for other volumes or drives. Deleting previous restore points creates more disk space if necessary. Subsequent restore points will delete earlier restore points when disk space is low.

Section 8.2
You have a desktop computer running Windows 7.

After several months of working fine, you are now having problems booting your machine. The system stalls immediately after the BIOS information screen. You need to get the system started as quickly as possible.

What should you do?
- Use the Last Known Good to roll back any new drivers that were installed.
- Use the Startup Repair tool
- Restore the computer using a system image.
- Use System Restore to roll the computer back to a previous point in time.
- Use the Startup Repair tool

Explanation
The best tool to use would be the Startup Repair tool, which includes many diagnostics test and can automatically repair many startup problems.

If you cannot go beyond the BIOS information screen, you will not be able to press F8 to choose Last Known Good or System Restore (in Safe Mode). In addition, even if you could get to the F8 options, these tools may not fix startup problems like a corrupt boot file. Restoring the system using a system image is a drastic and likely unnecessary solution as the Startup Repair tool will likely fix the problem with little downtime.

Section 8.3
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

You have configured scheduled backups in the Backup and Restore console to take a backup each week. You save the backups to a network location.

You find that backups are not being completed because the computer is asleep when the schedule time starts, and the computer is not waking up to perform the backup. The backup destination device is awake and available.

What should you do?
- Edit the schedule settings in the Backup and Restore console.
- Edit the network adapter settings and enable wake on LAN (WoL).
- Edit the backup task in Task Scheduler.
- Configure the power plan settings to wake the computer for scheduled tasks.
- Edit the backup task in Task Scheduler.

Explanation
In the Backup and Restore console, you can edit settings for the backup such as the destination, what files to back up, and when to perform the backup. For more advanced settings, you can edit the task in the Task Scheduler. For example, you can configure the computer to wake when the task needs to run, configure the backup to not run when on battery power, run only when the computer is idle, or require that a network connection exists before the backup starts. You can also configure what to do when the backup is interrupted or cannot be completed, such as configure the backup to run as soon as possible or wait until the next scheduled time.

The wake on LAN (WoL) feature on the network adapter allows a signal received over the network to wake the computer. This feature is used by management stations to wake the computer to perform maintenance or remote tasks. Power plan settings control what to do when power is low or when the system is idle, but do not prevent performing scheduled tasks.

Section 8.1
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

The computer is used by three different users. The computer has the following two volumes with default System Protection settings:

* C: ( System drive with user profiles and individual user files)
* E: (Data files common to all users)

Using the least effort possible, you need to protect the data on both volumes with restore points.

What should you do? (choose the answer which is most correct.)
- Enable System Protection for the E: volume.
- Use system Restore to enable the restore points.
- Use the Backup and Restore console to enable file restore points.
- Enable System Protection for the C: and E: volumes.
- Enable System Protection for the E: volume.

Explanation
You only need to enable System Protection for the E: volume. By default, System Protection settings are enabled on the system volume, but must be enabled on other volumes before restore points for files are created. If system Protection is enabled, Windows 7 automatically creates shadow copies of files that have been modified since the last restore point was created.

Sue System Restore to restore system settings from previously created restore point. Use the Backup and Restore console to create system image backups and file backups.

Section 8.2
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

You install a new art application on your computer. The application recommends that you install an updated video driver. You install the new driver.

You use the computer for several days, but notice that the display doesn't seem to refresh properly. You want to sue your previous display adapter driver to correct the problem. You need to implement a solution that minimizes downtime.

What should you do?
- Roll back the display adapter driver.
- Boot to the Last Known Good configuration.
- Restore the computer form a system image.
- use Previous Versions to revert back to the earlier driver.
- Restore the system to a restore point.
- Roll back the display adapter driver.

Explanation
To use a previous version of a device driver, use the 'Roll Back Driver' option in the driver's properties.

The Last Known Good configuration will not work because the system has been rebooted and the user has logged in since the change was made. Reverting to a restore point would work, but would take more time than rolling back the driver and might undo additional changes. Restoring the system would take even more time than using a restore point.

Previous versions restores previous versions of specific files, not drivers.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running windows 7 Professional with two volumes.

The C: volume contains system settings and is formatted with NTFS. The D: volume is formatted with FAT32.

You want to create a system image backup with the D: volume as the destination.

What should you do?
- Run 'wbadmin start backup -backuptarget:d:'.
- Convert the D: drive to NTFS.
- Upgrade to the Ultimate or Enterprise edition of Windows 7.
- Create the WindowsImageBackup folder on the D: volume.
- Convert the D: drive to NTFS.

Explanation
You need to convert the D: volume to NTFS. you will not be able to save system image to a non-NTFS volume.

You can run the 'wbadmin' command to create scheduled system image backups, but in this scenario it should use '-backuptarget:d:' to specify the D: volume as the destination. All Windows 7 editions can create a system image backup, but Ultimate and enterprise can store the backup on a network. You do not create the 'WindowsImageBackup' folder manually. The 'WindowsImageBackup' folder is created for system images, and is found in the root of the backup destination.

Section 8.1
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

The computer has two hard disks, one internal disk and one removable hard disk. You complete a full system backup and schedule regular backups of the system drive. All backups are saved to the removable hard disk. You also enable system protection on the system disk.

The disk holding the operating system fails. you replace the disk with a new one, and now need to get the system running again as quickly as possible. you boot the computer to the Windows installation disc.

What should you do?
- Run Startup Repair.
- Perform a system image recovery.
- Restore the system to a restore point.
- Use Previous Versions.
- Perform a system image recovery.

Explanation
Perform a system image recovery to repair the system. The recovery process uses the system image to restore the computer onto the new hard disk.

Restore points are saved on the same drive that they protect. Because the original drive has failed, all restore points on that drive are lost. Use Previous Versions to restore versions of files stored either in a restore point or a backup. Startup Repair is a utility that tries to automatically fix problems that keep the system from booting, such as repairing the boot configuration file or locating the operating system files on the hard disk.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running windows 7 Professional.

The computer has the following two volumes:

* The C: drive is the system drive with user profiles and individual user files
* The D: drive holds data files common to all users

You take the following actions:

* You create a system image backup that includes both the C: and D: drives.
* You schedule regular backups to back up all user libraries. The scheduled backup includes a system image.
* You use System Restore to take a snapshot.

You edit and save a file on the D: drive. You decide that you don't like the changes and want to revert to a previous version of the file.

You go to the 'Previous Versions' tab of the file and see nothing listed.

To avoid this situation in the future, you must ensure that you can revert files on the D: drive to earlier versions of the file from the 'Previous Versions' tab.

What should you do? (Select two. Each answer is a possible solution.)
- Create a system image backup.
- Enable System Protection for the D: drive.
- Modify the backup settings in Backup and Restore to include the D: drive.
- Change the Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) disabled.
- Enable System Protection for the D: drive.
- Modify the backup settings in Backup and Restore to include the D: drive.

Explanation
To create previous version of files as seen in the 'Previous Versions' tab of a file of folder:

* Enable System Protection settings on the D: drive. By default, System Protection settings are enabled on the system drive, but must be enabled on other drives. When enabled, the System Protection settings determine what type of files can be restored from previous versions.
* Use Backup and Restore settings to include the D: drive. The backups will include the specified files and folders int he .zip file.

The Volume Shadow copy Service (VSS) manages and implements shadow copies as seen in the 'Previous Versions' tab of a file or folder. Creating a system image backup is intended to restore a system back to its previous state after a hardware or system failure. The files in the system image will not show in the 'Previous Versions' tab of a file or folder.

Section 8.2
You have a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate.

You take a regular file backup every Friday night, which also includes a system image backup. System Protection has been enabled for all drives on the system.

On Wednesday you receive a new version of a graphic editing application that you use regularly. You install the new application, but find that the application does not work properly. When you try to run the original application, you find that the upgrade has deleted it from your system. You also find that some of the graphics files you had been working on yesterday have been deleted.

You need to get things back to normal as quickly as possible.

What should you do? ( Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Use Previous Versions to restore the missing files.
- Uninstall the application. Reinstall the original application from the instillation discs.
- In the Backup and Restore console, start a system image recovery.
- Use system Restore to revert to a restore point before you installed the application.
- Use Previous Versions to restore the missing files.
- Use system Restore to revert to a restore point before you installed the application.

Explanation
In this scenario, take the following actions:

* Use System Restore to revert to a previous restore point. Reverting to a previous restore point will remove any applications that have been installed and replace any applications that have been deleted since the restore point was created.
* Use previous Versions to restore the missing files from yesterday. You cannot use the file restore process because files have been modified since the last file backup (you would not be able to restore the latest changes to the file).

Restoring the entire computer using system image recovery would work, but would require too much time. Uninstalling the new application and reinstalling the old application would require more time than just using System Restore.

Section 8.2, 8.3
You have a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate.

You need to create a system repair disc in case you need to recover the Windows installation after a serious error.

You run the Backup and Restore console, but are unable to create the disc.

What should you do?
- Make a system image backup first.
- Boot from a windows installation disc and choose 'Repair Your Computer'.
- Install a CD/DVD burner.
- Install Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK).
- Install a CD/DVD burner.

Explanation
To create a system repair disc, you must have a CD/DVD burner. If you have a CD/DVD burner, run Backup and Restore console to create the system repair disc. When you boot a computer with the system repair disc, it will launch the System Recovery Options (also known as Windows Recovery Environment), which is a set of tools that you can use to recover the operating system.

Use the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) to help in system image preparation, maintenance, and deployment. Booting from the Windows installation disc and choosing 'Repair Your Computer' will launch the system Recovery Options. You do not need to create a system image backup before you create the system repair disk.

Section 8.1, 8.3
You have a computer that runs Windows 7.

You install a new application. During installation, the computer reboots but does not start. Pressing F8 during startup has no effect.

You need to start the computer using the least amount of effort.

What should you try next?
- Boot using the Last Known Good configuration.
- Boot from the installation disc and restore the system using a system image.
- Boot into Safe Mode and uninstall the application.
- Boot from the installation disc and restore to a restore point.
- Boot from the installation disc and restore to a restore point.

Explanation
To undo changes made to application, system settings or driver, you can restore the system to a restore point. You can restore to a restore point from within Windows, form within Safe Mode, or from Windows installation disc. If you cannot boot the system, either to the desktop or Safe Mode, boot the Windows installation disc.

In this scenario, you cannot boot into Safe Mode (pressing F8 does not work). Using the Last known Good configuration will not work because the change was not a hardware change, and also because you cannot access the advanced boot menu by pressing F8.

Restoring to a restore point si faster than doing a restore to a system image.

Section 8.3
You have a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate.

You want to use the Backup and Restore console to back up all user files on the computer.

To ensure you have space for all of the user files, you install a new hard drive, boot the computer, and initialize the drive in Disk Management.

When you run the Backup and Restore console, it does not show any valid destination drives.

What should you do? (Choose the most correct answer.)
- Format the new drive with FAT32 or NTFS.
- Use the 'wbadmin' command.
- Create the 'Backup Set' folder on the new drive.'
- Format the new drive with NTFS only.
- Format the new drive with FAT32 or NTFS.

Explanation
You need to format the new drive with the FAT or NTFS files system. You can save user file backups to the following location regardless of whether they are formatted with FAT or NTFS:

* Internal hard drive
* External hard drive
* Optical drive
* USB flash drive
* Network share
* VHD

System images can only be included in scheduled backups if the destination device is formatted with NTFS. The 'Backup Set' folder is created for file backups, and is found int he root of the backup destination. You do not create the 'Backup Set' folder. Use the 'wbadmin' command to create system image backups.

Section 8.1
You have a computer running Windows 7 Professional.

To protect your system and data, you use the Backup and Restore console to create a system image backup.

While working with a file, you accidentally delete some of the data. You need to restore the older version of the file, but you cannot find any previous versions of the file.

What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Run System Restore and use a restore point to restore the data.
- Attach the .vhd file created form the Backup and Restore console.
- Attach the .bak file created from the Backup and Restore console.
- Create a fresh restore point.
- Use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the file.
- Attach the .vhd file created form the Backup and Restore console.
- Use Windows Explorer to browse to and then copy the file.

Explanation
The Backup and Restore console creates system images in the .vhd format. To recover files from the .vhd file:

1. Attach (mount) the .vhd file so that it displays as a disk and can have a drive letter assignment.
2. Browse to and then copy the files you need.

Creating a new restore point will take a snapshot of the file, but it will not include the lost data. Restore points include shadow copies of user data files on protected volumes. However, restoring to a restore point will not restore or modify user data files.

Section 8.2
You have a computer running windows 7 Home Premium.

You schedule regular backups once a week. Backups include all user data files and system image backup.

After the first week, you see that backups are not being completed because the computer is asleep when the backup job is set to run.

You need to make sure that the scheduled backup can wake the computer. You also want to make sure that backup does not run if the computer is on battery power or stops if the computer switches to battery power.

What should you do?
- Edit the settings in Advanced system properties.
- Edit the settings in the Backup and Restore console.
- Edit the current power plan settings.
- Edit the settings in the Task scheduler
- Edit the settings in the Task scheduler

Explanation
To edit advanced settings for the scheduled backup, edit the backup task int he Task Scheduler. When you create a scheduled backup in the Backup and Restore console, a task is created with the settings you specify. By editing the task, you can control advanced conditions for the task. There are three categories of conditions:

* Idle conditions tell the task to run only if the computer is in an idle state for a specific amount of time when a trigger is activated. When you set this condition, you also set the amount of time to wait (after the task is triggered) for the computer to enter an idle state.
* Power conditions tell the task to run only if the computer is on AC power (not battery power) when the task trigger is activated. If this condition is set, you can also set a condition to stop the task if the computer switches to battery power. If both of these conditions are set for a task, then you have ensured that the task will only run when the computer is on AC power.
* Network conditions tell the task to run only if a specific named network connection is available or if any network connection is available when the task's trigger is activated.

Use the Backup and Restore console to modify where backups are stored, what to include in the backup, and how frequently to perform the backups. Advanced system properties may be edited to enable System Protection. If System Protection is enabled, Windows 7 automatically creates shadow copies of files. Edit the power plan to configure what happens when the computer is running low on battery power or has been idle for a period of time.

Section 8.1
You mange a computer that runs windows 7.

You have just added a new 300 GB hard drive to the computer. You create a single volume named 'Data' and format the volume using FAT32. The volume is assigned drive letter D:.

You copy several files to the new hard disk.

You would like the disk to be included in any restore points created on the computer.

What should you do first?
- Run 'convert.exe to change the drive to NTFS.
- Run system Restore.
- Run Backup and Restore.
- Edit the Previous Version settings in the D: drive properties.
- Edit System Protection settings in System Properties.
- Run 'convert.exe to change the drive to NTFS.

Explanation
Restore points can only be taken on drives formatted with NTFS. Before you can enable system protection on the disk, run 'convert.exe' to convert the drive to NTFS. After the drive has been converted, enable system protection on the drive by opening system Properties, then go to System Protection to enable restore points on the drive.

Use System Restore to restore to a restore point. Run Backup and Restore to back up the computer or user files, or to initiate a restore.

Section 3.2, 8.3