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Command line options for the Scanstate command:
/ui
/ue
/offlineWinOld
/o
/p /nocompress
/ui = Specify user(s) to be migrated
/ue = Specify user(s) to omit from migration
/offlineWinOld = Path to the offline Windows.old folder
/o = Allow overwriting of existing data
/p /nocompress = Generate a space estimate
You have a computer that runs Windows XP Professional. You want to upgrade your computer to Windows 7 Professional. You want to customize the migration of the application, user profile, and user data.
What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is required part of the solution.)
- Run Scanstate
- Edit the MigUser.xml file
- Run Migwiz
- Edit the MigApp.xml and MigDocs.xml files
- Edit the MigApp.xml, MigDocs.xml, and MigUser.xml files
Before or after the installation, use the Scanstate command to copy user profile information from the Windows XP installation. Use the MigApp.xml file to capture application configuration information and files. use either MigDocs.xml or MigUser.xml to migrate user profiles and user files. Do not use both MigDocs.xml and MigUser.xml at the same time as they perform similar tasks. With MigUser.xml, you can scan the system to automatically identify file extensions associated with installed applications. MigDocs.xml contains information on the location of user documents.
Running Migwiz runs the Windows Easy Transfer utility. Migwiz does not use the .xml files to customize migrated data.
You are preparing to install Windows 7 to a new computer. You copy the installation files from a DVD to a USB flash drive, then use bootsect to make the USB drive bootable. Using the RAID controller on the motherboard, you configure three hard disks in a RAID5 array. Using disk tools, you create a single partition that takes up the entire array. You insert the USB drive and boot the computer. The computer boots and shows you the following message:

ERROR loading operating system
Reboot and select the proper boot device

What should you do?
- Copy the RAID drivers to the USB device.
- In the BIOS, modify the SATA disk mode to IDE or AHCI.
- In the BIOS, modify the boot order to boot from the USB device first
- Run bcdedit on the USB device
The error message indicates that the computer could not find a boot loader program on the disk it used to try to boot from. It might be caused by trying to boot from a non-bootable drive such as a computer hard drive that has an active partition but no operating system installed. Change the boot order to check the USB drive first.
Use bcdedit to modify the BCD database. When you run bootsect, it makes the USB drive bootable by copying the BOOTMGR program and the BCD database to the drive. If the computer was able to load BOOTMGR from the USB drive, but the BCD database was corrupt or missing, you would have seen an error indicating that Windows could not start.
After you boot the USB drive and start Windows installation, you will need to have the RAID rivers to select the array as the installation destination, but copying the drivers to the USB drive will not make the computer boot from the USB drive.
Because the problem is with finding the boot loader program on the USB drive, any action that does not try to fix the USB drive will not work. Editing the SAA disk mode will not make the USB drive available for booting, but would prevent the computer from seeing the RAID array you crated earlier.
You need to install Windows 7 Enterprise edition on multiple computers.
Each computer has a single SATA hard drive, a PXE-compliant network card, a DVD drive, and several open USB ports. You will not be using WDS or MDT for the installation.
When you start each computer, you would like the computer to boot and start the installation process automatically without any intervention. You want to minimize the actions that you must perform on each computer.
What should you do next?
- Create an Unattend file on a USB drive. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the USB drive first. Insert the Windows installation disc into the DVD drive and the USB drive into a USB port.
- On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the network first
- Create a bootable USB drive that contains WinPE. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the USB drive first. insert the Windows installation disc into the DVD drive and the USB drive into a USB port.
- Create an Unattend file on a USB drive. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the optical drive first. Insert the Windows installation disk into the DVD drive and the USB drive into the USB port.
- Create an Unattend file on a USB drive. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the optical drive first. Insert the Windows installation disc into the DVD drive and the USB drive into the USB port.
Explanation
You can perform an Unattend installation to start and complete the installation without intervention. To perform an Unattend installation:
1. Create an Unattend file that includes the necessary responses to the prompts that occur during setup.
2. Save the file to a USB device using the name Autounattend.xml or Unattend.xml
3. Edit the computer BIOS to boot first from the optical drive.
4. Insert the installation disc into the DVD drive and the USB device in a free USB port.

When the computer boots, it will load the setup program from the installation disc, and automatically find the Unattend file on the USB device to complete the installation.
Boot from the network when you have a WDS server that can respond to the boot request from the computer. Use WinPE to boot the computer with a limited operating system to start the installation from a network share or to apply an image.
You have a computer that runs Windows Vista.
You need to perform a clean installation of Windows 7 onto the computer. You would also like to retain the system and user files from the Windows Vista installation.
What should you do?
- While running setup.exe on the Windows 7 installation media, select the Clean option.
- From the WIndows 7 installation media, select REPAIR YOUR COMPUTER.
- While running setup.exe on the Windows 7 installation media, select the UPGRADE option.
- While running setup.exe on the Windows 7 installation media, select the CUSTOM (ADVANCED) option.
- While running setup.exe on the Windows 7 installation media, select the CUSTOM (ADVANCED) option.

Explanation
You should select the CUSTOM (ADVANCED) option while running the setup.exe on the Windows 7 installation media. For a Clean (Custom) installation, Windows 7 creates the C:\Windows.old\ directory and retains system and user files from your previous operating system in the directory.
Select the UPGRADE option from the Install Windows dialog box to install Windows 7 on the same partition as the existing operating system. This is not a clean installation, because it maintains applications, user settings, and user files. There is no Clean option in the Install Windows dialog box. Selecting the REPAIR YOUR COMPUTER from the installation media will open the System Recovery Options, which are used to recover an existing operating system installation.
You have two computers: ComputerA is running Windows Vista Business and ComputerB is running Windows 7 Professional.
You are usingg USMT to migrate only the user profiles and user data from ComputerA to COmputerB. You need to specify the rules used for migration to include all .jpg files.

What should you do?
- Edit the MigApp.xml file
- Edit the MigDocs.xml file.
- Edit the MigUser.xml file.
- Edit the Config.xml file.
- Edit the MigUser.xml file

Explanation
When using USMT, use the MigUser.xml file to specify the rules used for migrating user profiles and user data based on file extension.

In addition to the MigUser.xml file, USMT uses the following XML-formatted configuration files to control which data is migrated from the source computer to the destination computer:
- MigApp.xml contains rules for migrating application settings
- MigDocs.xml contains information on location of user documents.
- Config.xml contains configuration information on which migration features should be excluded.
You have a computer that runs Windows XP Professional that you would like to upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate.
Your computer has the following specifications:
*Service pack 2
*1GHz processor
*256 MB video card
*40 GB free disk space
*DVD drive
You would like to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort possible.
What should you do first?
- Upgrade the video card
- Free up more disk space
- Install the latest XP service pack
- Add more memory
- Upgrade to a faster processor
- Add more memory

Explanation
you should upgrade the memory before installing Windows 7. Windows 7 HOme Premium, Professional, Ultimate, and Enterprise have the following minimum system requirements:

*1 GHz processor
*1 GB RAM
*40 GB free disk space
*128 MB video RAM
Upgrading to the latest service pack is not necessary because you can only perform a clean installation when moving from Windows XP to Windows 7. If you were upgrading from Windows Vista, you would need to install SP1 or later.
You are planning to install Windows 7 Home Premium edition on a new 64-bit computer.
The computer has the following hardware specifications:
*500 GB hard drive
*1 GB of RAM, one additional socket available
*Video card with 256 MB of memory
You need to ensure that the hardware will support Windows 7 Home Premium.
What should you do?
- Upgrade the video card
- Add a larger hard drive
- Add a faster processor
- Add more memory
- Add more memory
Explanation
You should add more memory. For Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, you need at least 2GB of RAM.
You have several computers in a network. Some of the computers do not have an optical drive.
Your boss has asked you to install Windows 7 on each of the computers.

What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Create a Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE) bootable disc.
- Copy the product DVD to a network share, then run the setup.exe file.
- Copy the product DVD to a USB flash drive and boot from the drive.
- Use the BOOTSECT command to make the USB flash drive bootable.
- Copy the product DVD to a USB flash drive and boot from the drive.
- Use the BOOTSECT command to make the USB flash drive bootable.
Explanation
In this case, you can use a USB flash drive as the installation source. you must use BOOTSECT to update the USB flash drive volume with the BOOTMGR boot loader program. This makes the USB drive bootable, and then you need to copy all the files located on the Windows 7 installation DVD to the USB flash drive.
You cannot use a Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE) bootable disc because some of the computers do not have an optical dive. Copying the contents of the installation DVD to the network share still requires that you boot from the network.
Describe the following command line options for the LOADSTATE command.

/ui
/ue
/lac
/lae
/hardlink
/ui = Specify user(s) to be migrated
/ue = Specify user(s) to omit from migration
/lac = Create user accounts
/lae = Enable user accounts
/hardlink = Restore from a linked migration store
You need to install Windows 7 Enterprise edition on multiple computers. Each computer has a single SATA hard drive. a PXE-compliant network card, a DVD drive, and several open USB ports.
You have decided to use Windows Deployment Services (WDS) to simply the installation. You configure the WDS server with everything necessary to perform the installation.
When you start each computer, you would like the computer to boot, connect to the WDS server, and start the installation process automatically without any intervention. You want to minimize the actions that you must perform on each computer.
What should you do next?
- Create a bootable USB drive that contains WinPE. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the USB drive first. Insert the USB drive into a USB port.
- On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the network first.
- One ach computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the optical drive first. Insert the Windows installation disc into the DV drive.
- Create an Unattend file on a USB drive. On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the optical drive first. Insert the Windows installation disc into the DVD drive and the USB drive into the USB port.
- On each computer, edit the BIOS to boot from the network first.
Using the WDS, you can perform a network installation. Because the computer has a PXE-complaint network card, you can boot from the computer directly to the network. The computer will locate the WDS server using the BOOTP protocol. The WDS server then instructs the computer to start the installation process. You prepare for the installation by creating the necessary files on the WDS server, including any required image files and an Unattend file to automate the installation process.
Booting first to a USB drive using WinPE would require that you manually connect to the WDS server to begin the installation. Using the installation disc, either with or without an Unattend file, would run the installation from the disc, no the WDS server
You have a single computer running Windows XP.
You perform a Custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing disk partition on the computer.
You need to migrate user profiles and user data from the Windows XP installation to the Windows 7 installation.

What should you do?
- Run LOADSTATE with the /lae option
- Run SCANSTATE with the /p and /nocompress options.
- Run LOADSTATE with the /offlineWinOld: option.
- Run SCANSTATE with the /offlineWinOld: option.
- Run SCANSTATE with the /offlineWinDir: option
- Run SCANSTATE with the /offlineWinOld: option
Explanation
If you perform a clean Windows 7 installation over Windows XP or Vista, Windows 7 creates the C:\Windows.old\ directory and retains system and user files from you previous operating system in the directory. If you want to transfer the previous user data from the Windows.old directory, you should run SCANSTATE with the /offlineWinOld: option to specify the path for the offline Windows.old folder.
use the /offlineWinDir: option when booting from Windows PE to scan an existing Windows installation directory (such as C:\Windows); do not use this option to scan the Windows.old directory. Run LOADSTATE /lae to enable a user account created with the /lac option. Run SCANSTATE with the /p and /nocompress options to generate a spaced estimate for the files to be migrated. You would not run LOADSTATE with the /offlineWinOld: option. LOADSTATE transfers the files and settings from the migration store once they have been placed there by SCANSTATE
You have two computers: ComputerA is running Windows Vista and ComputerB is running Windows 7.
You need to migrate all user profiles and data files from ComputerA to ComputerB. you need to ensure the user accounts on the destination computer are created and enabled during the migration.

What should you do?
- On ComputerB, run LOADSTATE with the /lae and /lac options.
- On ComputerA, run LOADSTATE with the /lae and /lac options.
- On ComputerB, run SCANSTATE with the /i option.
- On ComputerA, run SCANSTATE with the /ue option.
- On ComputerB, run LOADSTATE with the /lae and /lac options.

Explanation
On the destination computer (ComputerB), run the LOADSTATE with the /lae and /lac options.
* /lac creates a user account if the user account is local and does not exist on the destination computer.
* /lae enables the user account created with the /lac option

Use SCANSTATE on the source computer (ComputerA) to migrate user profiles and data from one computer to another. The /ue option excludes the specified user's data from the migration. The /I option includes the specified XML-formatted configuration file to control the migration.
You have a workstation running the 64-bit version of Windows 7 Ultimate that you would like to change to the 64-bit version of Windows 7 Professional. You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort and cost.

What should you do first?
- Run Anytime Upgrade.
- Perform a Custom (advanced) installation using the Windows 7 installation disc.
- Preform an Upgrade using the Windows 7 installation disc.
- Install all service packs and hotfixes
- Perform a Custom (advanced) installation using the Windows 7 installation disc.

Explanation
You must perform a custom (advanced) or clean installation when moving from a "higher" edition to a "lower" edition (such as from Ultimate to Professional).
An upgrade is possible when the edition is the same or higher (such as Home to Home or Home to Ultimate), and can be performed within the same version of Windows or between versions (such as from Windows Vista to Windows 7).
Run the Anytime Upgrade feature to upgrade from one edition to another within the same version of Windows; you cannot use Anytime Upgrade to "downgrade" between versions.
Because you are not performing an in-place upgrade, you do not need to install additional service packs or updates prior to the installation.
You have a workstation running the 32-bit version of Windows Vista business that you would like to upgrade to the 32-bit version of Windows 7 Professional.
You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort and cost.

What should you do first?
- Run Anytime Upgrade.
- Run SCANSTATE.
- Run the Upgrade Advisor for Windows Vista
- Perform an Upgrade using the Windows 7 installation disc.
- Perform a Custom (advanced) installation using the Windows 7 installation disc
To upgrade from Windows Vista to Windows 7, you can perform an upgrade as long as the platform is the same (32-bit or 64-bit) and the edition is the same or higher (such as Home Premium to Home Premium or Home Premium to Ultimate). You cannot upgrade from a higher edition to a lower edition (such as from Ultimate to Professional).
An upgrade preserves installed applications, drivers, and user profile data. A custom (advanced) installation installs a new instance of Windows. Applications must be installed and user profiles settings migrated following the installation.
Run the Anytime Upgrade feature to upgrade from one edition to another within the same version of Windows. For example, run the Anytime Upgrade to upgrade Windows 7 Home to Windows 7 Ultimate. The Upgrade Advisor for Windows Vista checks your system for the ability to upgrade to Windows Vista. You should run the Upgrade Advisor for Windows 7 prior to the upgrade
Use SCANSTATE to save user profile data and LOADSTATE to import user profile data on the new computer. These tools are not required when performing an in-place upgrade because user profile data is retained during the upgrade process.
You have a single computer running Windows Vista.
You are about to complete a clean installation of Windows 7 on the computer, and you need to migrate user profiles and user data from the previous installation of Windows Vista.

What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Run WET and use Easy Transfer cable as the transfer method
- Run WET and use External hard disk or USB flash drive as the transfer method.
- Use a side-by-side migration
- Use a wipe-and-load migration
- Run WET and use External hard disk or USB flash drive as the transfer method.
- Use a wipe-and-load migration

Explanation
You must use a wipe-and-load migration when the source and destination installations reside on the same computer.
You have two computers: ComputerA is running Windows Vista and ComptuerB is running Windows 7.
You need to migrate specific application settings from ComputerA to ComputerB by using USMT.

What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Edit the migdocs.xml file.
- Run SCANSTATE with the /p /nocompress option.
- Run SCANSTATE with the /I option.
- Edit the migapp.xml file.
- Run LOADSTATE with the /ui option.
- Edit the migapp.xml file.
- Run SCANSTATE with the /I option.

Explanation
To migrate specific application settings with USMT, you must:
*Edit the migapp.xml file to specify the rules for migrating application settings.
*Run SCANSTATE with the /I option to include the migapp.xml file during the migration.

Run LOADSTATE /ui to migrate the specified user's data. Run SCANSTATE /p /nocompress to generate a space-estimate file called Usmtsize.txt. The migDocs.xml contains information on the location of user documents, not application settings
You are installing Windows 7 on a new computer.
Using the RAID controller on the motherboard, you configure three hard disks in a RAID5 array. You leave the array unpartitioned and unformatted.
You edit the BIOS boot order to boot from the optical drive. You insert the installation DVD, boot to the disc, and start the installation.
When you are prompted to select the disk where you want to install Windows, the RAID array you created does not show as a possible destination disk.

What should you do?
- On the screen where you select the disk to install Windows, click Load Driver.
- Restart the installation and choose REPAIR YOUR COMPTUER. Open a command prompt and use DISKPART to partition and format the array.
- Reboot the computer. In the BIOS, change the SATA disk mode to RAID
- Restart the installation and chose REPAIR YOUR COMPTUER. Open the command prompt and run FIXMBR and FIXBOOT.
- On the screen where you select the disk to install Windows, click Drive OPTIONS (advanced)
- On the screen where you select the disk to install Windows, click Load Driver.

Explanation
When installing Windows to a RAID array, you will need to load the RAID drivers before Windows installation will be able to see the RAID array. After you load the drivers for the motherboard RAID controller, the array will appear as a possible destination disk. You can then select the disk or partition and format it.

To configure the RAID array, you must first set the SATA mode in the BIOS to RAID. If you change this value to something else, the installation program would be able to see all three disks as separate disks, not a RAID array. In the installation program, choose the advanced drive options after the array is available to partition and format the array.
None of the other options will fix the problem because each option depends on the installation program recognizing the RAID array as a valid storage destination. These options will not work until you load the necessary RAID drivers in the installation program
You have a computer that runs Windows XP Professional.
You want to upgrade your computer to Windows 7 Professional. You want your user profile settings to be applied to Windows 7, with all user files available following the upgrade.
You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort possible.

What should you do?
- Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. After the installation, boot into Windows 7 and run SCANSTATE and then LOADSTATE.
- Run LOADSTATE in Windows XP. Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. After the installation, boot into Windows 7 and run SCANSTATE.
- Perform an upgrade installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive.
- Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. After the installation, boot into Windows 7 and run Migwiz.
- Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. After the installation, boot into Windows 7 and run SCANSTATE and then LOADSTATE.
You have a Windows XP Professional system that you would like to upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate.

What should you do first?
- Run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.
- Run Anytime Upgrade.
- Install the latest service pack for Windows XP.
- Run the latest version of MBSA.
- Run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.

Explanation
When upgrading to Windows 7, run the Upgrade Advisor for Windows 7. The Upgrade Advisor:
*Verifies that the system can be upgraded to Windows 7.
* Makes sure that hardware is compatible with Windows 7.
*Installs any updates that must exist before proceeding with the installation.
You need to install Windows 7 Enterprise edition on multiple computers. You have an ISO image of the Windows 7 Enterprise edition installation disc that you will use for the installation.
You want to boot the computer to a command prompt, connect to a network share, and then run setup from the shared folder. You create a shared folder named WinInstall on a server.

What should you do? (Select two. Each choice is a required part of the solution.)
- Copy the ISO image file to the network share.
- Extract the ISO image and copy all files in the image to the shared folder.
- Create a bootable disc with WinPE and the necessary network drivers. Edit the BIOS to boot form the optical drive first.
- Extract the ISO image and copy the install.wim file to the network share.
- Make sure your computer has a PXE-compliant network card. Edit the BIOS to boot from the network first
- Extract the ISO image and copy all files in the image to the shared folder.
- Create a bootable disc with WinPE and the necessary network drivers. Edit the BIOS to boot form the optical drive first.

Explanation
To boot the computer, you will need WinPE on a disc or a USB flash drive. Make sure you have the necessary network card drivers so that once booted, you can establish the network connection to the shared folder. To be able to start the installation, you will need to be able to runt he setup program from the network share. Extract the files from the ISO image and copy those file to the network share.
If you boot the computer from the network, your network requires a BOOTP server that can respond to the startup requests and send the operating system to the computer.
When copying files to the network share, you will need to copy the entire DVD contents to the share by extracting the files from the ISO image. If you copy the ISO file to the share, then WinPE will not be able to read the files within the ISO image. Copying only the install.wim file does not give you access to the setup program that is required to start the installation.
You have several computers in a domain network.
Your company develops software that runs on both Windows XP and Windows 7. Programmers need to have computers that will dual boot between Windows XP and Windows 7.
You need to configure each system to meet the programmer's requirements.

What should you do?
- Install Windows XP first, and then install Windows 7 on another partition.
- Install Windows XP first, and then install Windows 7 on the same partition.
- Install Windows 7 first, and then install Windows XP on another partition.
- Install Windows 7 first, and then install Windows XP on the same partition.
- Install Windows XP first, and then install Windows 7 on another partition.

Explanation
Windows 7 must be installed on its own partition. TO install Windows 7 onto a system that already has an operating system installed, you must install to a different hard disk or a separate partition. installation Windows 7 onto a partition that already has an operating system installed will reformat the partition, destroying the existing installation.
When installing different versions of Windows on the same system, start installing the oldest version first. install Windows 7 last. Any programs and drivers you want to use must be installed one ach operating system that you want to use them with.
You are planning to install Windows 7 on a new 64-bit computer.
The computer will be joined to a domain and you plan to configure the computer to boot from a .VHD image.

Which Windows 7 edition should you use?
- Professional (32-bit)
- Enterprise (32-bit)
- Home Premium (64-bit)
- Ultimate (64-bit)
- Ultimate (64-bit)

Explanation
You should install Windows 7 Ultimate (64-bit) edition. Windows 7 Ultimate or Enterprise editions will both support booting from a .VHD image. Since the target computer is 64-bit, the 64-bit version is the correct choice.
Windows 7 Home Premium and Professional editions do not support booting from a .VHD image. In addition, Windows 7 Home Premium will not support joining the domain.
You are performing a network installation of Windows 7 on a new computer.
You boot the computer using Windows PE.
You need to install a device driver for the network adapter.
What should you do?
- Run sysprep.exe
- Run peimage.exe
- Run drvload.exe
- Run wdsutil.exe
- Run drvload.exe

Explanation
To add out-of-box drivers to a running Windows PE environment, use drvload.exe. The DRVLOAD command uses one or more driver .inf files as inputs.
Use peimage.exe to add a driver to an offline Windows PE image. use wdsutil.exe to manage and maintain Windows Deployment Services (WDS) from the command line.
Use sysprep.exe to manage system images and the Windows installation process.
You have a computer running Windows 7. The computer is part of a domain.
You need to transfer user profiles and data files to the computer from a network share using USMT; however; you do not have USMT.

What should you do?
- Download USMT from Microsoft.
- Download the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) from Microsoft.
-Download the Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit from Microsoft.
-Retrieve USMT from the Windows 7 installation DVD
- Download the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) from Microsoft.

Explanation
To obtain USMT for Windows 7, you must download the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK).
You cannot obtain a stand-alone version of USMT for Windows 7. The Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit contains tools to evaluate and mitigate application compatibility issues before deploying Windows 7. The Windows 7 installation DVD provides tools for installing and repairing a Windows 7 installation.
You have a computer that runs Windows Vista Business RTM that you would like to upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate.
Your computer has the following specifications:
*1 GHz processor
*1 GB RAM
*128 MB video card
*40 GB free disk space
*DVD drive

You would like to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort possible.

What should you do first?

- Add more memory
- Install the latest service pack
- Upgrade to a faster processor
- Upgrade the video card
- Free up more disk space
- Install the latest service pack

Explanation
You will need to install the latest service pack ( or at least service pack 1) before upgrading Windows Vista to Windows 7. All other system specification are within the recommended minimums.
You have a workstation running the 32-bit version of Windows Vista Professional that you would like to upgrade to the 64-bit version of Windows 7 Professional. You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort and cost.

Which installation should you select
- Upgrade
- Anytime Upgrade
- Custom (advanced)
- Migration
- Custom (advanced)

Explanation
When changing the platform type (from 32-bit to 64-bit), you must perform a Custom (advanced) installation.
Run the Anytime Upgrade feature to upgrade form one edition to another within the same version of Windows.
You have a stand-alone computer running Windows 7 Professional.
You notice that the Aero features are not displayed. The computer has a 19 inch CRT screen that supports refresh rates up to 65 Hertz and a video card with 64 MB RAM.
You need to use the Aero features.

What should you do?
- Upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate edition.
- Set the Windows theme to Windows 7.
- Replace the monitor with a 19 inch LCD monitor.
- Replace the video adapter card with one that has a least 128 MB ram
- Replace the video adapter card with one that has a least 128 MB ram
You have two computers: ComputerA is running Windows XP Professional and ComputerB is running Windows 7 Professional.
You need to transfer user profiles and data files from ComputerA to ComptuerB.

What should you do? (Select two. Each answer is a complete solution)
- Run Windows Easy Transfer
- Run File Settings and Transfer Wizard
- Run USMT
- Run the Upgrade Advisor
- Run Windows Easy Transfer
- Run USMT
You have a computer that runs Windows XP Professional that you would like to upgrade to Windows 7 Professional.
You run the setup program and install Windows 7 on the same computer and hard drive.

What should you do next?
- Run the Windows Easy Transfer wizard to save user profile settings to a network share.
- Re-install all applications.
- Run LOADSTATE.
- Run Anytime Upgrade
- Re-install all applications.
You intend to install Windows 7 by using a Windows 7 installation DVD on several computers.
To save time, you would like to automate the installation of Windows 7 for each computer.

What should you do?
-Create an answer file named install.wim. Place the file on a USB flash drive, and run setup.exe
- Create an answer file named automated.exe. Place the file on a USB flash drive, and run automated.exe
- Create an answer file named config.xml. Place the file on a USB flash drive, and run setup.exe
- Create an answer file named autounattend.xml. Place the file on a USB flash drive, and run setup.exe
- Create an answer file named autounattend.xml. Place the file on a USB flash drive, and run setup.exe
You have a Windows Vista system that you would like to upgrade to Windows 7.
you want to make sure that everything in your current system is compatible with Windows 7.

What should you do?
- Run the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor.
- Run the Windows Vista Anytime Upgrade.
- Run the latest version of MBSA
- Run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.
- Run the Windows 7 Anytime Upgrade
- Run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.
You have a stand-alone computer running both Vista and Windows 7.

The computer currently boots to windows 7 by default. You need the computer to boot to Windows Vista as the default operating system instead.

What should you do?
- Update the boot.ini file
- Run bcdedit.exe.
- run drvload.exe
- Update the C:\Windows.old\ directory
- Run bcdedit.exe.

Explanation
Run bcdedit.exe to change which Windows operating system starts by default. Bcdedit.exe is a command-line tool used to manage Boot Configuration Data (BCD) entries, with each entry identifying a separate installation instance.

The boot.ini file is not used in the Windows 7 or Windows Vista operating systems.
You have a computer that runs Windows XP Professional.
You want to upgrade your computer to Windows 7 Professional. You want to maintain as much of the application, user profile, and user data as possible.
You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort possible.

What should you do?
- Perform an upgrade installation of the Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. Boot into Windows 7 and run SCANSTATE, then run LOADSTATE.
- Perform an upgrade installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive.
- Run SCANSTATE in Windows XP. Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. Boot into Windows 7 and re-install all applications. Run LOADSTATE.
- Run SCANSTATE in Windows XP. Perform a custom (advanced installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. Boot into Windows 7 and run LOADSTATE
- Run SCANSTATE in Windows XP. Perform a custom (advanced) installation of Windows 7 to the existing hard drive. Boot into Windows 7 and re-install all applications. Run LOADSTATE.
You have a computer on your workbench without an operating system.
You would like to install Windows 7 Enterprise 32-bit edition on the computer.
The computer has the following hardware specifications:
*Hard drive with 12 GB of free space
*1 GB of Ram, on additional socket available
*One Pentium 2.8 GHz processor, one additional socket available
*Video card with 128 MB of memory

You need to change the hardware so that you can install Windows 7 Enterprise.
What should you do?
- Upgrade the video card
- Free up some space on the hard drive
- Add a faster processor
- add more memory
- Free up some space on the hard drive

Explanation
You need to free up disk space on the hard drive before you can install Windows 7. All 32-bit editions of Windows 7 require 16 GB of available space for installation. All 64-bit edition of Windows 7 require 20 GB of available space.
You have a workstation running the 32-bit version of Windows 7 Professional that you would like to upgrade to the 32-bit version of Windows 7 Ultimate.
You want to perform the upgrade with the least amount of effort and cost while maintaining as much user data as possible.

What should youd o first?
- Run SCANSTATE.
- Run Anytime Upgrade.
- Perform a Custom (advanced) installation using the Windows 7 installation disc.
- Run LOADSTATE
- Run Anytime Upgrade.

Explanation
Run the Anytime Upgrade feature to upgrade from one edition to another within the same version of Windows.