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135 Cards in this Set

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16A. Sweet Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A very dark, sweet, full-bodied, slightlyroasty ale that can suggest coffee-and-cream, or sweetenedespresso.

16A. Sweet Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Mild roasted grain aroma, sometimes with coffeeand/or chocolate notes. An impression of cream-like sweetnessoften exists. Fruitiness can be low to moderately high. Diacetyllow to none. Hop aroma low to none, with floral or earthynotes.

16A. Sweet Stout


Appearance:

Appearance: Very dark brown to black in color. Can beopaque (if not, it should be clear). Creamy tan to brown head.

16A. Sweet Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Dark roasted grain/malt impression with coffeeand/or chocolate flavors dominate the palate. Hop bitterness ismoderate. Medium to high sweetness provides a counterpointto the roasted character and hop bitterness, and lasts into thefinish. Low to moderate fruity esters. Diacetyl low to none. Thebalance between dark grains/malts and sweetness can vary,from quite sweet to moderately dry and somewhat roasty.

16A. Sweet Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full-bodied and creamy. Low tomoderate carbonation. High residual sweetness fromunfermented sugars enhances the full-tasting mouthfeel.

16A. Sweet Stout


History:

History: An English style of stout developed in the early1900s. Historically known as “Milk” or “Cream” stouts, legallythis designation is no longer permitted in England (but isacceptable elsewhere). The “milk” name is derived from the useof lactose, or milk sugar, as a sweetener. Originally marketed asa tonic for invalids and nursing mothers.

16A. Sweet Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: The sweetness in most SweetStouts comes from a lower bitterness level than most otherstouts and a high percentage of unfermentable dextrins.Lactose, an unfermentable sugar, is frequently added toprovide additional residual sweetness. Base of pale malt, andmay use roasted barley, black malt, chocolate malt, crystalmalt, and adjuncts such as maize or brewing sugars.

16A. Sweet Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.044 – 1.060
FG: 1.012 – 1.024


IBUs: 20 – 40


SRM: 30 – 40


ABV: 4.0 – 6.0%

16A. Sweet Stout


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples: Bristol Beer Factory Milk Stout,Left Hand Milk Stout, Lancaster Milk Stout, Mackeson's XXXStout, Marston’s Oyster Stout, Samuel Adams Cream Stout

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A very dark, full-bodied, roasty, maltyale with a complementary oatmeal flavor. The sweetness,balance, and oatmeal impression can vary considerably.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Mild roasted grain aromas, generally with a coffeelikecharacter. A light malty sweetness can suggest a coffeeand-cream impression. Fruitiness should be low to mediumhigh.Diacetyl medium-low to none. Hop aroma medium-lowto none, earthy or floral. A light grainy-nutty oatmeal aroma isoptional.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Appearance:

Appearance: Medium brown to black in color. Thick, creamy,persistent tan- to brown-colored head. Can be opaque (if not, itshould be clear).

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Similar to the aroma, with a mild roasted coffee tocoffee-and-cream flavor, and low to moderately-high fruitiness.Oats and dark roasted grains provide some flavor complexity;the oats can add a nutty, grainy or earthy flavor. Dark grainscan combine with malt sweetness to give the impression ofBJCP Beer Style Guidelines – 2015 Edition 29milk chocolate or coffee with cream. Medium hop bitternesswith the balance toward malt. Medium-sweet to medium-dryfinish. Diacetyl medium-low to none. Hop flavor medium-lowto none, typically earthy or floral.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full body, with a smooth, silky,velvety, sometimes an almost oily slickness from the oatmeal.Creamy. Medium to medium-high carbonation.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


History:

Comments: Generally between Sweet and Irish Stouts insweetness. Variations exist, from fairly sweet to quite dry, aswell as English and American versions (American versions tendto be more hoppy, less sweet, and less fruity). The level ofbitterness also varies, as does the oatmeal impression. Lightuse of oatmeal may give a certain silkiness of body and richnessof flavor, while heavy use of oatmeal can be fairly intense inflavor with an almost oily mouthfeel, dryish finish, and slightgrainy astringency. When judging, allow for differences ininterpretation.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Pale, caramel and dark roastedmalts (often chocolate) and grains. Oatmeal or malted oats (5-20% or more) used to enhance fullness of body and complexityof flavor. Hops primarily for bittering. Can use brewing sugarsor syrups. English ale yeast.

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.045 – 1.065


FG: 1.010 – 1.018


IBUs: 25 – 40


SRM: 22 – 40


ABV: 4.2 – 5.9%

16B. Oatmeal Stout


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples: Anderson Valley Barney FlatsOatmeal Stout, Broughton Scottish Oatmeal Stout, FigueroaMountain Stagecoach Stout, St-Ambroise Oatmeal Stout,Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout, Young's Oatmeal Stout

16C. Tropical Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A very dark, sweet, fruity, moderatelystrong ale with smooth roasty flavors without a burntharshness.

16C. Tropical Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Sweetness evident, moderate to high intensity.Roasted grain aromas moderate to high, and can have coffee orchocolate notes. Fruitiness medium to high. May have amolasses, licorice, dried fruit, and/or vinous aromatics.Stronger versions can have a subtle clean aroma of alcohol.Hop aroma low to none. Diacetyl low to none.

16C. Tropical Stout


Appearance:

Appearance: Very deep brown to black in color. Clarityusually obscured by deep color (if not opaque, should be clear).Large tan to brown head with good retention.

16C. Tropical Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Quite sweet with a smooth dark grain flavors, andrestrained bitterness. Roasted grain and malt character can bemoderate to high with a smooth coffee or chocolate flavor,although the roast character is moderated in the balance by thesweet finish. Moderate to high fruity esters. Can have a sweet,dark rum-like quality. Little to no hop flavor. Medium-low tono diacetyl.

16C. Tropical Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full body, often with a smooth,creamy character. May give a warming (but never hot)impression from alcohol presence. Moderate to moderatelyhighcarbonation.

16C. Tropical Stout


History:

History: Originally high-gravity stouts brewed for tropicalmarkets, became popular and imitated by local brewers oftenusing local sugars and ingredients.

16C. Tropical Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Similar to a sweet stout, butwith more gravity. Pale and dark roasted malts and grains.Hops mostly for bitterness. May use adjuncts and sugar toboost gravity. Typically made with warm-fermented lageryeast.

16C. Tropical Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.056 – 1.075


FG: 1.010 – 1.018


IBUs: 30 – 50


SRM: 30 – 40


ABV: 5.5 – 8.0%

16C. Tropical Stout


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


ABC Extra Stout,


Dragon Stout,


Jamaica Stout,


Lion Stout,


Royal Extra Stout

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A very dark, moderately strong, fairlydry, stout with prominent roast flavors.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Moderate to high roasted grain aromas, often withcoffee, chocolate and/or lightly burnt notes. Low to mediumfruitiness. May have a sweet aroma, or molasses, licorice, driedfruit, and/or vinous aromatics. Stronger versions can have asubtle, clean aroma of alcohol. Hop aroma moderately low tonone, can be earthy, herbal or floral. Diacetyl low to none.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Appearance:



Appearance: Very deep brown to black in color. Clarityusually obscured by deep color (if not opaque, should be clear).Large tan to brown head with good retention.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Moderate to high roasted grain and malt flavor with acoffee, chocolate, or lightly burnt grain character, althoughwithout a sharp bite. Moderately dry. Low to medium esters.Medium to high bitterness. Moderate to no hop flavor, can beearthy, herbal, or floral. Diacetyl medium-low to none.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full body, often with a smooth,sometimes creamy character. May give a warming (but neverhot) impression from alcohol presence. Moderate tomoderately-high carbonation.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


History:

History: Stronger stouts brewed for the export market today,but with a history stretching back to the 18th and 19th centurieswhen they were more heavily-hopped versions of strongerexport stouts. Guinness Foreign Extra Stout (originally, WestIndia Porter, later Foreign Extra Double Stout) was firstbrewed in 1801 according to Guinness with “extra hops to giveit a distinctive taste and a longer shelf life in hot weather, thisis brewed [today] in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. It[currently] makes up 40% of all the Guinness brewed aroundthe world.”

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Pale and dark roasted maltsand grains, historically also could have used brown and ambermalts. Hops mostly for bitterness, typically English varieties.May use adjuncts and sugar to boost gravity.

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.056 – 1.075


FG: 1.010 – 1.018


IBUs: 50 – 70


SRM: 30 – 40


ABV: 6.3 – 8.0%

16D. Foreign Extra Stout


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Coopers Best Extra Stout,


GuinnessForeign Extra Stout,


The Kernel Export Stout,


RidgewayForeign Export Stout,


Southwark Old Stout

17A. British Strong Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: Overall Impression: An ale of respectable alcoholicstrength, traditionally bottled-conditioned and cellared. Canhave a wide range of interpretations, but most will have varyingdegrees of malty richness, late hops and bitterness, fruityesters, and alcohol warmth. Judges should allow for asignificant range in character, as long as the beer is within thealcohol strength range and has an interesting ‘British’character, it likely fits the style. The malt and adjunct flavorsand intensity can vary widely, but any combination shouldresult in an agreeable palate experience.An ale of respectable alcoholicstrength, traditionally bottled-conditioned and cellared. Canhave a wide range of interpretations, but most will have varyingdegrees of malty richness, late hops and bitterness, fruityesters, and alcohol warmth. Judges should allow for asignificant range in character, as long as the beer is within thealcohol strength range and has an interesting ‘British’character, it likely fits the style. The malt and adjunct flavorsand intensity can vary widely, but any combination shouldresult in an agreeable palate experience.

17A. British Strong Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Malty-sweet with fruity esters, often with a complexblend of dried-fruit, caramel, nuts, toffee, and/or otherspecialty malt aromas. Some alcohol notes are acceptable, butshouldn’t be hot or solventy. Hop aromas can vary widely, buttypically have earthy, resiny, fruity, and/or floral notes. Thebalance can vary widely, but most examples will have a blend ofmalt, fruit, hops, and alcohol in varying intensities.

17A. British Strong Ale


Appearance:



Appearance: Deep gold to dark reddish-brown color (manyare fairly dark). Generally clear, although darker versions maybe almost opaque. Moderate to low cream- to light tan-coloredhead; average retention.

17A. British Strong Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Medium to high malt character often rich with nutty,toffee, or caramel flavors. Light chocolate notes are sometimesfound in darker beers. May have interesting flavor complexityfrom brewing sugars. Balance is often malty, but may be wellhopped, which affects the impression of maltiness. Moderatefruity esters are common, often with a dark fruit or dried fruitcharacter. The finish may vary from medium dry to somewhatsweet. Alcoholic strength should be evident, though notoverwhelming. Diacetyl low to none, and is generally notdesirable.

17A. British Strong Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to full, chewy body. Alcohol warmth isoften evident and always welcome. Low to moderatecarbonation. Smooth texture.

17A. British Strong Ale


History:

History: The heritage varies since this category generallyreflects a grouping of unrelated minor styles with limitedproduction. Some are historical recreations while others aremodern. Some directly descend from older styles such asBurton ales, while others maintain a historical connection witholder beers. As a grouping, the notion is relatively modernsince beers of this strength category would not have beenabnormal in past centuries. Do not use this category groupingto infer historical relationships between examples; this isalmost a modern British specialty

17A. British Strong Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Grists vary, often based on palemalt with caramel and specialty malts. Some darker examplessuggest that dark malts (e.g., chocolate, black malt) may beappropriate, though sparingly so as to avoid an overly roastedcharacter. Sugary adjuncts are common, as are starchyadjuncts (maize, flaked barley, wheat). Finishing hops aretraditionally English.

17A. British Strong Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.055 – 1.080


FG: 1.015 – 1.022


IBUs: 30 – 60


SRM: 8 – 22


ABV: 5.5 – 8.0%

17A. British Strong Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Fuller’s 1845,


Harvey’s ElizabethanAle,


J.W. Lees Manchester Star,


Samuel Smith’s WinterWelcome,


Young's Winter Warmer

17B. Old Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: An ale of moderate to fairly significantalcoholic strength, bigger than standard beers, though usuallynot as strong or rich as barleywine. Often tilted towards amaltier balance. “It should be a warming beer of the type that isbest drunk in half pints by a warm fire on a cold winter’s night”– Michael Jackson.

17B. Old Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Malty-sweet with fruity esters, often with a complexblend of dried-fruit, vinous, caramelly, molasses, nutty, toffee,light treacle, and/or other specialty malt aromas. Some alcoholand oxidative notes are acceptable, akin to those found inSherry or Port. Hop aromas not usually present due toextended aging.

17B. Old Ale


Appearance:

Appearance: Light amber to very dark reddish-brown color(most are fairly dark). Age and oxidation may darken the beerfurther. May be almost opaque (if not, should be clear).Moderate to low cream- to light tan-colored head; may beadversely affected by alcohol and age.

17B. Old Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Medium to high malt character with a luscious maltcomplexity, often with nutty, caramelly and/or molasses-likeflavors. Light chocolate or roasted malt flavors are optional,but should never be prominent. Balance is often malty-sweet,but may be well hopped (the impression of bitterness oftendepends on amount of aging). Moderate to high fruity estersare common, and may take on a dried-fruit or vinous character.The finish may vary from dry to somewhat sweet. Extendedaging may contribute oxidative flavors similar to a fine oldSherry, Port or Madeira. Alcoholic strength should be evident,though not overwhelming. Diacetyl low to none. Some woodagedor blended versions may have a lactic or Brettanomycescharacter; but this is optional and should not be too strong.Any acidity or tannin from age should be well-integrated andcontribute to complexity in the flavor profile, not be adominant experience.

17B. Old Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to full, chewy body, although olderexamples may be lower in body due to continued attenuationduring conditioning. Alcohol warmth is often evident andalways welcome. Low to moderate carbonation, depending onage and conditioning. Light acidity may be present, as well assome tannin if wood-aged; both are optional.

17B. Old Ale


History:

History: Historically, an aged ale used as stock ales forblending or enjoyed at full strength (stale or stock refers tobeers that were aged or stored for a significant period of time).There are at least two definite types in Britain today, weakerdraught ones that are similar aged milds of around 4.5%, andstronger ones that are often 6-8% or more.

17B. Old Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Composition varies, althoughgenerally similar to British Strong Ales. The age character isthe biggest driver of the final style profile, which is morehandling than brewing. May be aged in wood, but should nothave a strong wood character.

17B. Old Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.055 – 1.088


FG: 1.015 – 1.022


IBUs: 30 – 60
SRM: 10 – 22


ABV: 5.5 – 9.0%

17B. Old Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Burton Bridge Olde Expensive,


Gale’s Prize Old Ale,


Greene King Strong Suffolk Ale,


MarstonOwd Roger,


Theakston Old Peculier

17C. Wee Heavy


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: Rich, malty, dextrinous, and usuallycaramel-sweet, these beers can give an impression that issuggestive of a dessert. Complex secondary malt and alcoholflavors prevent a one-dimensional quality. Strength andmaltiness can vary, but should not be cloying or syrupy.

17C. Wee Heavy


Aroma:

Aroma: Deeply malty, with a strong caramel component.Lightly smoky secondary aromas may also be present, addingcomplexity; peat smoke is inappropriate. Diacetyl should below to none. Low to moderate esters and alcohol are oftenpresent in stronger versions. Hops are very low to none, andcan be slightly earthy or floral.

17C. Wee Heavy


Appearance:

Appearance: Light copper to dark brown color, often withdeep ruby highlights. Clear. Usually has a large tan head, whichmay not persist. Legs may be evident in stronger versions.

17C. Wee Heavy


Flavor:

Flavor: Richly malty with significant caramel (particularly instronger versions). Hints of roasted malt may be present(sometimes perceived as a faint smoke character), as may somenutty character, all of which may last into the finish. Peatsmoke is inappropriate. Hop flavors and bitterness are low tomedium-low, so the malt presence should dominate thebalance. Diacetyl should be low to none. Low to moderateesters and alcohol are usually present. Esters may suggestplums, raisins or dried fruit. The palate is usually full andsweet, but the finish may be sweet to medium-dry, sometimeswith a light roasty-grainy note.

17C. Wee Heavy


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full-bodied, with some versions(but not all) having a thick, chewy viscosity. A smooth,alcoholic warmth is usually present and is quite welcome sinceit balances the malty sweetness. Moderate carbonation.

17C. Wee Heavy


History:

History: More related to historical brews than modern lower strengthScottish ales, these beers have their roots in the strongales of the 1700s and 1800s, although formulations andmethods have changed. A premium product, often producedfor export. Modern versions have lower starting and finishinggravities than their historical ancestors.

17C. Wee Heavy


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt, withroasted barley for color. May use some crystal malt for coloradjustment. Slight smoke character may be present in someversions, but derives from roasted grains or from the boil.Peated malt is absolutely not traditional.

17C. Wee Heavy


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.070 – 1.130


FG: 1.018 – 1.040


IBUs: 17 – 35


SRM: 14 – 25


ABV: 6.5 – 10.0%

17C. Wee Heavy


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Belhaven Wee Heavy,


GordonHighland Scotch Ale,


Inveralmond Blackfriar,


McEwan'sScotch Ale,


Orkney Skull Splitter,


Traquair House Ale

17D. English Barleywine


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A showcase of malty richness andcomplex, intense flavors. Chewy and rich in body, withwarming alcohol and a pleasant fruity or hoppy interest. Whenaged, it can take on port-like flavors. A wintertime sipper.

17D. English Barleywine


Aroma:

Aroma: Very rich and strongly malty, often with a caramel likearoma in darker versions or a light toffee character in palerversions. May have moderate to strong fruitiness, often with adark- or dried-fruit character, particularly in dark versions.The hop aroma may range from mild to assertive, and istypically floral, earthy, or marmalade-like. Alcohol aromaticsmay be low to moderate, but are soft and rounded. Theintensity of these aromatics often subsides with age. The aromamay have a rich character including bready, toasty, toffee,and/or molasses notes. Aged versions may have a sherry-likequality, possibly vinous or port-like aromatics, and generallymore muted malt aromas.

17D. English Barleywine


Appearance:

Appearance: Color may range from rich gold to very darkamber or even dark brown (often has ruby highlights, butshould not be opaque). Low to moderate off-white head; mayhave low head retention. May be cloudy with chill haze atcooler temperatures, but generally clears to good to brilliantclarity as it warms. The color may appear to have great depth,as if viewed through a thick glass lens. High alcohol andviscosity may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.

17D. English Barleywine


Flavor:

Flavor: Strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavorsranging from bready, toffee, and biscuity in paler versionsthrough nutty, deep toast, dark caramel, and/or molasses indarker versions. Moderate to high malty sweetness on thepalate, although the finish may be moderately sweet tomoderately dry (depending on aging). Some oxidative orvinous flavors may be present, and often complex alcoholflavors should be evident. Moderate to fairly high fruitiness,often with a dark- or dried-fruit character. Hop bitterness mayrange from just enough for balance to a firm presence; balancetherefore ranges from malty to somewhat bitter. Pale versionsare often more bitter, better attenuated, and might show morehop character than darker versions; however, all versions aremalty in the balance. Low to moderately high hop flavor, oftenfloral, earthy, or marmalade-like English varieties.

17D. English Barleywine


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety, luscioustexture (although the body may decline with longconditioning). A smooth warmth from aged alcohol should bepresent. Carbonation may be low to moderate, depending onage and conditioning.

17D. English Barleywine


History:

History: Strong ales of various formulations have long beenbrewed in England, and were known by several names. Themodern barleywine traces back to Bass No. 1, which was firstcalled a barleywine in 1872. Barleywines were darker beersuntil Tennant (now Whitbread) first produced Gold Label, agold-colored barleywine in 1951. Usually the strongest aleoffered by a brewery, and in recent years many commercialexamples are now vintage-dated and offered as a limitedreleasewinter seasonal specialty. The original barleywine stylethat inspired derivative variations in Belgium, the UnitedStates, and elsewhere in the world.

17D. English Barleywine


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: High-quality, well-modifiedpale malt should form the backbone of the grist, with judiciousamounts of caramel malts. Dark malts should be used withgreat restraint, if at all, as most of the color arises from alengthy boil. English hops such as Northdown, Target, EastKent Goldings and Fuggles are typical. Characterful Britishyeast.

17D. English Barleywine


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.080 – 1.120


FG: 1.018 – 1.030


IBUs: 35 – 70


SRM: 8 – 22


ABV: 8.0 – 12.0%

17D. English Barleywine


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Adnams Tally-Ho,


Burton BridgeThomas Sykes Old Ale,


Coniston No. 9 Barley Wine,


Fuller’sGolden Pride,


J.W. Lee’s Vintage Harvest Ale,


Robinson’s OldTom

18A. Blonde Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: Easy-drinking, approachable, malt orientedAmerican craft beer, often with interesting fruit, hop,or character malt notes. Well-balanced and clean, is arefreshing pint without aggressive flavors.

18A. Blonde Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Light to moderate sweet malty aroma, possibly with alight bready or caramelly note. Low to moderate fruitiness isoptional, but acceptable. May have a low to medium hoparoma, and can reflect almost any hop variety although citrusy,floral, fruity, and spicy notes are common.

18A. Blonde Ale


Appearance:

Appearance: Light yellow to deep gold in color. Clear tobrilliant. Low to medium white head with fair to goodretention.

18A. Blonde Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Initial soft malty sweetness, but optionally some lightcharacter malt flavor (e.g., bread, toast, biscuit, wheat) can alsobe present. Caramel flavors typically absent; if present, they aretypically low-color caramel notes. Low to medium fruity estersoptional, but are welcome. Light to moderate hop flavor (anyvariety), but shouldn’t be overly aggressive. Medium-low tomedium bitterness, but the balance is normally towards themalt or even between malt and hops. Finishes medium-dry toslightly malty-sweet; impression of sweetness is often anexpression of lower bitterness than actual residual sweetness.

18A. Blonde Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Medium to high carbonation. Smooth without being heavy.

18A. Blonde Ale


History:

History: An American craft beer style produced by manymicrobreweries and brewpubs, particularly those who cannotproduce lagers. Regional variations exist (many US West Coastbrewpub examples are more assertive, like pale ales) but inmost areas this beer is designed as the least challenging beer intheir lineup.

18A. Blonde Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Generally all malt, but caninclude up to 25% wheat malt and some sugar adjuncts. Anyhop variety can be used. Clean American, lightly fruity English,or Kölsch yeast. May also be made with lager yeast, or coldconditioned.Some versions may have honey, spices and/orfruit added, although if any of these ingredients are strongerthan a background flavor they should be entered in thosespecialty categories instead.

18A. Blonde Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.038 – 1.054


FG: 1.008 – 1.013


IBUs: 15 – 28


SRM: 3 – 6


ABV: 3.8 – 5.5%

18A. Blonde Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Kona Big Wave Golden Ale,


PelicanKiwanda Cream Ale,


Russian River Aud Blonde,


VictorySummer Love,


Widmer Citra Summer Blonde Brew

18B. American Pale Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A pale, refreshing and hoppy ale, yetwith sufficient supporting malt to make the beer balanced anddrinkable. The clean hop presence can reflect classic or modernAmerican or New World hop varieties with a wide range ofcharacteristics. An average-strength hop-forward paleAmerican craft beer, generally balanced to be more accessiblethan modern American IPAs.

18B. American Pale Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Moderate to strong hop aroma from American or NewWorld hop varieties with a wide range of possiblecharacteristics, including citrus, floral, pine, resinous, spicy,tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, or melon. None of thesespecific characteristics are required, but hops should beapparent. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hoppresentation, and may optionally show small amounts ofspecialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuit, caramelly).Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. Dry hopping (ifused) may add grassy notes, although this character should notbe excessive.

18B. American Pale Ale


Appearance:

Appearance: Pale golden to light amber. Moderately largewhite to off-white head with good retention. Generally quiteclear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

18B. American Pale Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Moderate to high hop flavor, typically showing anAmerican or New World hop character (citrus, floral, pine,resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, melon, etc.).Low to moderate clean grainy-malt character supports the hoppresentation, and may optionally show small amounts ofspecialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balanceis typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the maltpresence should be supportive, not distracting. Caramel flavorsare often absent or fairly restrained (but are acceptable as longas they don’t clash with the hops). Fruity yeast esters can bemoderate to none, although many hop varieties are quite fruity.Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish.Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish, but theaftertaste should generally be clean and not harsh. Dry hopping(if used) may add grassy notes, although this character shouldnot be excessive.

18B. American Pale Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Moderate to highcarbonation. Overall smooth finish without astringency andharshness.

18B. American Pale Ale


History:

History: A modern American craft beer era adaptation ofEnglish pale ale, reflecting indigenous ingredients (hops, malt,yeast, and water). Prior to the explosion in popularity of IPAs,was traditionally the most well-known and popular ofAmerican craft beers.

18B. American Pale Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Pale ale malt, typically North American two-row. American or New World hops, with a wide range of allowable characteristics. American or English ale yeast (neutral to lightly fruity). Specialty grains may add character and complexity, but generally make up a relatively small portion of the grist. Grains that add malt flavor and richness, light sweetness, and toasty or bready notes are often used (along with late hops) to differentiate brands.

18B. American Pale Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.045 – 1.060


FG: 1.010 – 1.015


IBUs: 30 – 50


SRM: 5 – 10


ABV: 4.5 – 6.2%

18B. American Pale Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Ballast Point Grunion Pale Ale,


Firestone Walker Pale 31,
Great Lakes Burning River,


SierraNevada Pale Ale,


Stone Pale Ale,


Tröegs Pale Ale

19A. American Amber Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: An amber, hoppy, moderate-strengthAmerican craft beer with a caramel malty flavor. The balancecan vary quite a bit, with some versions being fairly malty andothers being aggressively hoppy. Hoppy and bitter versionsshould not have clashing flavors with the caramel malt profile.

19A. American Amber Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Low to moderate hop aroma with characteristicstypical of American or New World hop varieties (citrus, floral,pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, ormelon). A citrusy hop character is common, but not required.Moderately-low to moderately-high maltiness (usually with amoderate caramel character), which can either support,balance, or sometimes mask the hop presentation. Esters varyfrom moderate to none.

19A. American Amber Ale


Appearance:

Appearance: Amber to coppery-brown in color. Moderatelylarge off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear,although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

19A. American Amber Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Moderate to high hop flavor with characteristicstypical of American or New World hop varieties (citrus, floral,pine, resinous, spicy, tropical fruit, stone fruit, berry, ormelon). A citrusy hop character is common, but not required.Malt flavors are moderate to strong, and usually show an initialmalty sweetness followed by a moderate caramel flavor (andsometimes other character malts in lesser amounts). Malt andhop bitterness are usually balanced and mutually supportive,but can vary either way. Fruity esters can be moderate to none.Caramel sweetness and hop flavor/bitterness can lingersomewhat into the medium to full finish.

19A. American Amber Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. Medium to highcarbonation. Overall smooth finish without astringency.Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth.

19A. American Amber Ale


History:

History: A modern American craft beer style developed as avariation from American Pale Ales. Known simply as Red Alesin some regions, these beers were popularized in the hoplovingNorthern California and the Pacific Northwest areasbefore spreading nationwide.

19A. American Amber Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Pale ale malt, typically NorthAmerican two-row. Medium to dark crystal malts. May alsocontain specialty grains which add additional character anduniqueness. American or New World hops, often with citrusyflavors, are common but others may also be used.

19A. American Amber Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.045 – 1.060


FG: 1.010 – 1.015


IBUs: 25 – 40


SRM: 10 – 17


ABV: 4.5 – 6.2%

19A. American Amber Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Deschutes Cinder Cone Red,


FullSail Amber,


Kona Lavaman Red Ale,


North Coast Ruedrich'sRed Seal Ale,


Rogue American Amber Ale,


Tröegs HopBackAmber Ale

19C. American Brown Ale


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A malty but hoppy beer frequently withchocolate and caramel flavors. The hop flavor and aromacomplements and enhances the malt rather than clashing withit.

19C. American Brown Ale


Aroma:

Aroma: Moderate malty-sweet to malty-rich aroma withchocolate, caramel, nutty, and/or toasty qualities. Hop aromais typically low to moderate, of almost any variety thatcomplements the malt. Some interpretations of the style mayfeature a stronger hop aroma, an American or New World hopcharacter (citrusy, fruity, tropical, etc.), and/or a fresh dryhoppedaroma (all are optional). Fruity esters are moderate tovery low. The dark malt character is more robust than otherbrown ales, yet stops short of being overly porter-like. The maltand hops are generally balanced.

19C. American Brown Ale


Appearance:

Appearance: Light to very dark brown color. Clear. Low tomoderate off-white to light tan head.

19C. American Brown Ale


Flavor:

Flavor: Medium to moderately-high malty-sweet or malty richflavor with chocolate, caramel, nutty, and/or toasty maltcomplexity, with medium to medium-high bitterness. Themedium to medium-dry finish provides an aftertaste havingboth malt and hops. Hop flavor can be light to moderate, andmay optionally have a citrusy, fruity, or tropical character,although any hop flavor that complements the malt isacceptable. Very low to moderate fruity esters.

19C. American Brown Ale


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. More bitterversions may have a dry, resiny impression. Moderate tomoderately-high carbonation.

19C. American Brown Ale


History:

History: An American style from the modern craft beer era.Derived from English Brown Ales, but with more hops. Pete’sWicked Ale was one of the first and best known examples, andinspired many imitations. Popular with homebrewers, wherevery hoppy versions were sometimes called Texas Brown Ales(this is now more appropriately a Brown IPA).

19C. American Brown Ale


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt, pluscrystal and darker malts (typically chocolate). American hopsare typical, but continental or New World hops can also beused.

19C. American Brown Ale


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.045 – 1.060


FG: 1.010 – 1.016


IBUs: 20 – 30


SRM: 18 – 35


ABV: 4.3 – 6.2%

19C. American Brown Ale


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Anchor Brekle’s Brown,


Big SkyMoose Drool Brown Ale,


Brooklyn Brown Ale,


Bell’s BestBrown,


Cigar City Maduro Brown Ale,


Smuttynose Old BrownDog Ale,


Telluride Face Down Brown

20A. American Porter


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A substantial, malty dark beer with acomplex and flavorful dark malt character.

20A. American Porter


Aroma:

Aroma: Medium-light to medium-strong dark malt aroma,often with a lightly burnt character. Optionally may also showsome additional malt character in support (grainy, bready,toffee-like, caramelly, chocolate, coffee, rich, and/or sweet).Hop aroma low to high, often with a resiny, earthy, or floralcharacter. May be dry-hopped. Fruity esters are moderate tonone.

20A. American Porter


Appearance:

Appearance: Medium brown to very dark brown, often withruby- or garnet-like highlights. Can approach black in color.Clarity may be difficult to discern in such a dark beer, but whennot opaque will be clear (particularly when held up to thelight). Full, tan-colored head with moderately good headretention.

20A. American Porter


Flavor:

Flavor: Moderately strong malt flavor usually features alightly burnt malt character (and sometimes chocolate and/orcoffee flavors) with a bit of grainy, dark malt dryness in thefinish. Overall flavor may finish from dry to medium-sweet.May have a sharp character from dark roasted grains, butshould not be overly acrid, burnt or harsh. Medium to highbitterness, which can be accentuated by the dark malt. Hopflavor can vary from low to high with a resiny, earthy, or floralcharacter, and balances the dark malt flavors. The dark maltand hops should not clash. Dry-hopped versions may have aresiny flavor. Fruity esters moderate to none.

20A. American Porter


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. Moderately low tomoderately high carbonation. Stronger versions may have aslight alcohol warmth. May have a slight astringency from darkmalts, although this character should not be strong.

20A. American Porter


History:

History: A stronger, more aggressive version of pre prohibitionporters and/or English porters developed in themodern craft beer era. Historical versions existed, particularlyon the US East Coast, some of which are still being produced36 BJCP Beer Style Guidelines – 2015 Edition(see the Historical Beer, Pre-Prohibition Porter). This styledescribes the modern craft version.

20A. American Porter


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: May contain several malts,prominently dark malts, which often include black malt(chocolate malt is also often used). American hops typicallyused for bittering, but US or UK finishing hops can be used; aclashing citrus quality is generally undesirable. Ale yeast caneither be clean US versions or characterful English varieties.

20A. American Porter


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.050 – 1.070


FG: 1.012 – 1.018


IBUs: 25 – 50


SRM: 22 – 40


ABV: 4.8 – 6.5%

20A. American Porter


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Anchor Porter,


Boulevard Bully!Porter,


Deschutes Black Butte Porter,


Founders Porter,


GreatLakes Edmund Fitzgerald Porter,


Smuttynose Robust Porter,


Sierra Nevada Porter

20B. American Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: A fairly strong, highly roasted, bitter, hoppy dark stout. Has the body and dark flavors typical of stouts with a more aggressive American hop character and bitterness.

20B. American Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Moderate to strong aroma of roasted malts, often having a roasted coffee or dark chocolate quality. Burnt or charcoal aromas are acceptable at low levels. Medium to very low hop aroma, often with a citrusy or resiny character. Medium to no esters. Light alcohol-derived aromatics are also optional.

20B. American Stout


Appearance:

Appearance: Generally a jet black color, although some mayappear very dark brown. Large, persistent head of light tan tolight brown in color. Usually opaque.

20B. American Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Moderate to very high roasted malt flavors, oftentasting of coffee, roasted coffee beans, dark or bittersweetchocolate. May have the flavor of slightly burnt coffee grounds,but this character should not be prominent. Low to mediummalt sweetness, often with rich chocolate or caramel flavors.Medium to high bitterness. Low to high hop flavor, generallycitrusy or resiny. Low to no esters. Medium to dry finish,occasionally with a lightly burnt quality. Alcohol flavors can bepresent up to medium levels, but smooth.

20B. American Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Medium to full body. Can be somewhat creamy,particularly if a small amount of oats have been used toenhance mouthfeel. Can have a bit of roast-derivedastringency, but this character should not be excessive.Medium-high to high carbonation. Light to moderately strongalcohol warmth, but smooth and not excessively hot.

20B. American Stout


History:

History: A modern craft beer and homebrew style that appliedan aggressive American hoping regime to a strong traditionalEnglish or Irish stout. The homebrew version was previouslyknown as West Coast Stout, which is a common namingscheme for a more highly-hopped beer.

20B. American Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Common American base maltsand yeast. Varied use of dark and roasted malts, as well ascaramel-type malts. Adjuncts such as oatmeal may be presentin low quantities. American hop varieties.

20B. American Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.050 – 1.075


FG: 1.010 – 1.022


IBUs: 35 – 75


SRM: 30 – 40


ABV: 5.0 – 7.0%

20B. American Stout


Commercial Examples:

Commercial Examples:


Avery Out of Bounds Stout,


Deschutes Obsidian Stout,


North Coast Old No. 38,


RogueShakespeare Stout,


Sierra Nevada Stout

20C. Imperial Stout


Overall Impression:

Overall Impression: An intensely-flavored, big, dark alewith a wide range of flavor balances and regionalinterpretations. Roasty-burnt malt with deep dark or driedfruit flavors, and a warming, bittersweet finish. Despite theintense flavors, the components need to meld together to createa complex, harmonious beer, not a hot mess.

20C. Imperial Stout


Aroma:

Aroma: Rich and complex, with variable amounts of roastedgrains, maltiness, fruity esters, hops, and alcohol. The roastedmalt character can take on coffee, dark chocolate, or slightlyburnt tones and can be light to moderately strong. The maltaroma can be subtle to rich and barleywine-like. Mayoptionally show a slight specialty malt character (e.g., caramel),but this should only add complexity and not dominate. Fruityesters may be low to moderately strong, and may take on acomplex, dark fruit (e.g., plums, prunes, raisins) character.Hop aroma can be very low to quite aggressive, and maycontain any hop variety. An alcohol character may be present,but shouldn’t be sharp, hot, or solventy. Aged versions mayhave a slight vinous or port-like quality, but shouldn’t be sour.The balance can vary with any of the aroma elements takingcenter stage. Not all possible aromas described need bepresent; many interpretations are possible. Aging affects theintensity, balance and smoothness of aromatics.

20C. Imperial Stout


Appearance:

Appearance: Color may range from very dark reddish-brownto jet black. Opaque. Deep tan to dark brown head. Generallyhas a well-formed head, although head retention may be low tomoderate. High alcohol and viscosity may be visible in “legs”when beer is swirled in a glass.

20C. Imperial Stout


Flavor:

Flavor: Rich, deep, complex and frequently quite intense, withvariable amounts of roasted malt/grains, maltiness, fruityesters, hop bitterness and flavor, and alcohol. Medium toaggressively high bitterness. Medium-low to high hop flavor(any variety). Moderate to aggressively high roasted malt/grainflavors can suggest bittersweet or unsweetened chocolate,cocoa, and/or strong coffee. A slightly burnt grain, burntcurrant or tarry character may be evident. Fruity esters may below to intense, and can take on a dark fruit character (raisins,plums, or prunes). Malt backbone can be balanced andsupportive to rich and barleywine-like, and may optionallyshow some supporting caramel, bready or toasty flavors. Thepalate and finish can vary from relatively dry to moderatelysweet, usually with some lingering roastiness, hop bitternessand warming character. The balance and intensity of flavorscan be affected by aging, with some flavors becoming moresubdued over time and some aged, vinous or port-like qualitiesdeveloping.

20C. Imperial Stout


Mouthfeel:

Mouthfeel: Full to very full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety,luscious texture (although the body may decline with longconditioning). Gentle smooth warmth from alcohol should bepresent and noticeable, but not a primary characteristic; inwell-conditioned versions, the alcohol can be deceptive. Shouldnot be syrupy or under-attenuated. Carbonation may be low tomoderate, depending on age and conditioning.

20C. Imperial Stout


History:

History: A style with a long, although not necessarilycontinuous, heritage. Traces roots to strong English portersbrewed for export in the 1700s, and said to have been popularwith the Russian Imperial Court. After the Napoleonic warsinterrupted trade, these beers were increasingly sold inEngland. The style eventually all but died out, until beingpopularly embraced in the modern craft beer era, both inEngland as a revival and in the United States as areinterpretation or re-imagination by extending the style withAmerican characteristics.

20C. Imperial Stout


Characteristic Ingredients:

Characteristic Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt, withgenerous quantities of roasted malts and/or grain. May have acomplex grain bill using virtually any variety of malt. Any typeof hops may be used. American or English ale yeast.

20C. Imperial Stout


Vital Statistics:

Vital Statistics:


OG: 1.075 – 1.115


FG: 1.018 – 1.030


IBUs: 50 – 90


SRM: 30 – 40


ABV: 8.0 – 12.0%

20C. Imperial Stout


Commercial Examples:

American –Bell’s ExpeditionStout, Cigar City Marshal Zhukov’s Imperial Stout, GreatDivide Yeti Imperial Stout, North Coast Old Rasputin ImperialStout, Sierra Nevada Narwhal Imperial Stout;


English – Courage Imperial Russian Stout, Le Coq ImperialExtra Double Stout, Samuel Smith Imperial Stout