Wilfred Owen's Poetry Essay

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Wilfred Owen's Poetry

In this essay, I have decided to analyse two poems by the war poet
Wilfred Owen, taken from his writings on the First World War. Both of these poems ('Dulce et Decorum Est' and 'Anthem for Doomed Youth') portray Owen's bitter angst towards the war, but do so in very different ways.

Owen developed many of his poetic techniques at Craiglockhart Military
Hospital, where he spent much of the war as an injured soldier, but it was only through the influence of fellow soldier and poet, Siegrfried
Sassoon, that he began capturing his vivid visions of the war in the form of poetry. Many would argue that it was while writing his war poems, that Owen felt most able to express his ideas on paper, and he
certainly
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Like all sonnets, this one has fourteen lines, divided up into two movements, with an initial, alternate line rhyme scheme used, changing to a more unusual sextet in the final movement.
In this movement, the first and fourth lines rhyme, as do the second and third, and it ends on a couplet. This poem, unlike 'Dulce et
Decorum Est', starts off at a quicker pace, then continues to decelerate throughout the poem, drawing to a slow sombre close; another, equally effective way to really drive home Owen's point to the poem in the final few lines. The slowing down of the rhythm is aided by syllabic variation along the lines, before settling on a steady, ten per line for the last couple of lines.

But these technical formats alone did not make Owen's war poems as believable and empathetic as they actually are. To express his views and notions, he could escape from the frowning public who disagreed with his controversial stance on the war, and put them on paper. And it is perhaps this real hatred towards the war that he felt, and the real belief that he was right, that spurred Owen into some of the most heartfelt poems that he ever wrote. But the personal feel of his poems alone would not create the final result Owen wanted, it is his use of cunning poetic techniques that have made his poems believable and realistic enough for the reader.

Take 'Dulce et Decorum Est' for example. Immediately, in the first stanza, Owen uses similes to

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