The Real Monster, Victor Frank Essays

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The Real Monster, victor frankenstein
     Mary Shelley's narrative, Frankenstein is the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creation. 'It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils…by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.(52)'; This was the time and the place in which the creature came to life. Victor Frankenstein thought that his creation was a hideous monster, but his ignorance blinded him from the truth. In veracity, Victor Frankenstein was the real monster this was evident from his selfishness, from his cruelty and rejection of his creation, and
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'My tale was not one to announce publicly; its astounding horror would be looked upon as madness by the vulgar. (75)'; This statement made by Victor Frankenstein shows how selfish he is. Near the end of the novel, the creature says: 'I shall be with you on your wedding night. (164)'; Victor Frankenstein never even thinks that it will kill his wife; he just thinks that it will kill him, which is another sign of selfishness.
      Another trait that makes Victor Frankenstein the real monster is his animosity and rejection of the creation. From the beginning, Frankenstein abhorred the monster, this is visible when he says, '…he was ugly then, but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion , it became a thing such as even Dante could not have conceived. (53)'; Later in the novel, Frankenstein refers to his creation as 'monster,'; 'Devil,'; and 'Fiend,'; again, showing his animosity towards the creature. When the creature and Frankenstein meet in the mountains, it says, '…Yet you my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us… but I am the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded. I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous. (94)'; In this statement, the creature says that it would be good and

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