The Most Influential Woman of the Past Millenium: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Rosa Parks

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The Most Influential Woman of the Past Millenium: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Rosa Parks

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

If there had never been born an Elizabeth Cady Stanton, women may have never seen the rights and privileges granted to us in the Nineteenth Amendment. She was the leading fighter and driving force for women's rights; she dedicated her whole life to the struggle for equality. Elizabeth had learned from her father at an early age how to debate and win court cases, and she had also experienced the discriminations against women first hand. These two qualities lead to the most influential and motivating speeches against inequality when she was older. Elizabeth vowed to herself that she would "change how
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In hopes of receiving more property rights for married women, Stanton became a lawyer in 1840 mainly to address Congress with a higher ranking. Even though her attempt to get through to the higher officials was a failure, many more people began to "follow her lead" (Saari 37). Stanton deserves the number one pole due to the vast number of associations she set up to fight for equality. In fact, along with Susan B. Anthony, Stanton started the Women's Loyal National League to fight slavery in 1863, and they collected over 300,000 signatures against slavery. Elizabeth tried to run for a position in Congress in 1866, but was beaten by a rather large margin after winning only 24 of 12,000 votes. She also started the National Women's Suffrage Association in 1869, for which she served as president. Through these associations, Stanton along with her close friends, Mott and Anthony, protested the abuse of women, supported the idea of equal child care by both parents, and the idea of educating men and women together (Trager 56).

Stanton formed many allies who helped her to strongly urge Senator Aaron A. Sargent to introduce a woman suffrage amendment to Congress. Despite their efforts, the Nineteenth Amendment, granting women the right to vote didn't come until forty years later. The ideas she pushed for were "far-fetched" (Schlesinger 49) for the people of her time. Nevertheless,

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