The Influence of Conservatism, Liberalism and Nationalism in Europe in the Period 1815-1848

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The Influence of Conservatism, Liberalism and Nationalism in Europe in the Period 1815-1848
*No Works Cited The years between 1815-1830 saw the rise of a number of related and competing ideologies, each holding a powerful influence in their own time. That influence often extended well into the future, continuing to the present day. Largely, these ideologies were reactions to or products of Enlightenment thinking, although they all went in a variety of different directions. Conservatism, Liberalism and Nationalism had great impact on European society and reflected new radical ideas and principles of the different classes (e.g. bourgeoisie, monarchy). Many of the new movements dealt with ideas that had been around for a while; but it
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Conservatism in society emphasized the merits of the status quo and endorsed the prevailing distribution of power, wealth, and social standing.

LIBERALISM

Liberalism in the early 19th century can't quite be compared to liberalism found today. In fact, much of what was liberal in the 19th century (free trade, keeping government out of business) is today considered conservative.
Beginning in Spain and France during the 1820s, liberalism soon spread to England. Consisting of businessmen and professionals, the liberals wanted modern, efficient self-government, although they were not always for universal male suffrage. They wanted freedom of the press and freedom of the assembly. They wanted constitutions, and Laissez Faire economic policies, such as free trade and low tariffs. They were generally against unions.
Really, liberalism then was the ideology of the "bourgeoisie" (the business and professional class), and was geared towards protecting bourgeois interests. Still, the liberals invariably argued that what was for their benefit was actually to the benefit of everyone.

NATIONALISM

Nationalism was the most powerful of all ideologies in this period. France and Great Britain's strong nation-states had inspired jealousy throughout the rest of Europe; other nations, disorganized as they were, wanted to unify. German intellectuals

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