The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

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The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

While there are many differences between the societies portrayed in dystopic literature, they still have the common bond of lacking the fundamental freedoms required for a properly operated society to exist. This cannot be truer for The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. These novels prove that the individual's freedom are sacrificed in dystopic societies when the government controls the knowledge, individuality and relationships of each person in order for there to be stability in the society.
Dystopia is shown in each of the novels through: the use of conflict demonstrating the authority over knowledge, the use
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The restrictions over expressing oneself is used as a form of keeping citizens in their place, consequently keeping the society stable and running, even though this comes at the cost of the freedom of each individual. Along with the society portrayed in The Handmaid's
Tale, the leaders of the Brave New World society have sacrificed all past knowledge of the world, including art, science and literature with the goal of maintaining a stable society. For example, as an outsider, John 'the savage' has not had his past kept secret from him, and therefore cannot comprehend why such important knowledge should be kept secret: "'Art, science - you seem to have paid a fairly high price for your happiness' 'Anything, else?' 'Well, religion, of course there used to be something called God' 'Why don't you tell them?' 'For the same reason as we don't give them Othello'" (Huxley
210). The leaders of the government have rid their society of all things created in and relating to the past, such as literature or religion because there is a possibility that it will provoke one's mind and thus create a rebellion or volatility in the society, threatening their stability. Through an outsider's perspective, the control over the society is seen as costly instead of helpful, creating a conflict from feelings of bitterness between John and the society's regime. The conditioning each member of the society is subjected to make them lack

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