The Battle of Agincourt Essay

1998 Words 8 Pages
This reason for this report is to cover the Battle of Agincourt. The topics that will be discussed in this paper include: factors contributing to the Battle of Agincourt, the English forces, French forces, weapons and equipment, terrain (the effects it had on both armies), key battles prior to the Battle of Agincourt, the Battle of Agincourt, and the Battle of Agincourt in relation to selected principles of war.
Factors Contributing to the War The Battle of Agincourt, which took place on 25October1415, was one of the many battles fought during the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453). The Hundred Years’ War was an ongoing dispute between English and French nations. One thing that caused a major dispute was the death of Charles IV, King of
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On the left and right wing of the entire formation were two formations that consisted on archers. These formations formed in an outward flank in order to direct their archery firepower toward the center of the French army’s formations. Allied with the English was the Duke of York, Sir Edward of Norwich. During the battle, King Henry would appoint the Duke of York as the commander of the men-at-arms component of his right flank. This component formed the advance guard/vanguard. Also allied with the English was Lord Camoys. During the battle, King Henry would appoint Lord Camoys as the commander of the men-at-arms component to his left flank. The men in this formation would make up the rearguard during the battle. King Henry remained in the center for the best command and control. The English consisted of anywhere from 6,000-9,000 men. Majority of these soldiers were longbow archers while the rest of the army consisted of dismounted knights and men-at-arms.
The French Forces The French army during the Battle of Agincourt was commanded by Charles d’Albret. Unlike the English, the French army had greater numbers in terms of soldiers. Majority of these soldiers were knights and men-at-arms. The French forces also had a number of archers but these would be obsolete to the English army’s longbow-men. The French army broke their forces down into 3 ranks. Each rank was

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