The Attitude to War in The Charge of the Light Brigade By Alfred Lord Tennyson and Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

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The Attitude to War in The Charge of the Light Brigade By Alfred Lord Tennyson and Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

'Dulce et Decorum Est' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' are about battle and soldiers; they portray the experience of war in different ways. Both poems employ visual imagery of battle and the effects on the people. 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' is more about the actions of the whole brigade whereas, 'Dulce et Decorum Est' is focused on the effects of war on individuals.

In his poem, Wilfred Owen describes the men as individuals, rather than as 'the army' or 'they'. He describes them as lonely: 'Old beggars under sacks' is used to show just how different they are from
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He does not call it hopeless, but instead heroic. He shows how noble and well disciplined the soldiers were to follow the order to attack. Lord Tennyson never fought in the war, and he wrote the poem after reading about the charge in a newspaper. His intention was to make sure the men were never forgotten, and that their efforts were not forgotten.

In first stanza of the poem he has used a strong rhythm by saying 'Half a league, half a league, half a league onwards'. This is supposed to sound like horses galloping and give us the feeling that we are there.

In the second stanza, the writer tells us that the soldiers have made a terrible mistake. The use of 'blunder'd' and 'dismay'd' make you sure that something has gone wrong and that there has been confusion. Tennyson has limited his comment about the mistake to these few words because he wanted to show how heroic these men were by charging into the valley of death. He doesn't want us to get confused about who made the mistake. He said 'Some one had blunder'd' because he didn't want to put all the blame on one person inparticular because Lord Cardigan misheard the orders. He thought that they had the order to charge into the valley. They charged on horseback with sabres trying to avoid the artillery all three sides. They turned around after the gunmen had fled and fought against the Russian cavalry.

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