The Atkins Diet Versus Low-Fat Diets Essay

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The Atkins Diet Versus Low-Fat Diets

The Atkins diet and the USDA recommended low-fat diet seem to be on the opposite sides of the diet spectrum. These two diets have many differences and no apparent similarities, other than the goal of losing weight. These differences include the results of the diets, possible side effects, and the theories behind the diets. The Atkins diet recommends reducing carbohydrate intake in order to lose weight.
Conversely, the low-fat diet recommends reducing caloric intake to lose weight; especially the calories from fat. The Atkins diet and the low- fat diet differ in the methods behind their diets, the results that participants experience while on the diet and the possible side
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The amount of carbohydrates that are allowed in the low-fat diet is nearly 10 times the amount of carbohydrates that are allowed in the Atkins diet per day.
Whereas the amount of carbohydrates in the low-fat diet are higher than what the Atkins diet allows, the amount of fat and protein that is allowed by the Atkins diet is higher than what is allowed by the low-fat diet. Exactly how much higher the amount of fat and protein the Atkins diet allows is impossible to calculate because they allow and unlimited amount and therefore the amount would differ from dieter to dieter. The
Atkins diet restricts the carbohydrate intake in order to lose weight, whereas the low-fat diet reduces caloric intake to a fixed amount, while emphasizing the reduction in calories from fat.

The differences in the method of both the Atkins and the low-fat diet inherently affect the results of weight loss that a dieter would see. Several studies have found that after six months those on the low- carbohydrate diets, for example the Atkins diet, lost 3.9 kilograms (8.6 pounds) more weight than the low-fat diet group. However, these same studies found that after the participants were on the diets for twelve months, there was no significant difference in the amount of weight that was lost. Astrup, Larsen, and Harper (2004) believe that these studies provide evidence that a low carbohydrate diet does produce

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