Rhetorical Strategies in Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

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“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”-Essay
In the 1700’s the Puritans left England for the fear of being persecuted. They moved to America for religious freedom. The Puritans lived from God’s laws. They did not depend as much on material things, and they had a simpler and conservative life. More than a hundred years later, the Puritan’s belief toward their church started to fade away. Some Puritans were not able to recognize their religion any longer, they felt that their congregations had grown too self-satisfied. They left their congregations, and their devotion to God gradually faded away. To rekindle the fervor that the early Puritans had, Jonathan Edwards and other Puritan ministers led a religious revival through New
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154) With his use of dramatic imagery, he persuaded the Puritans to have their faith back to God. In this quote, hell is personified, as it “lay hold on them, and swallow them up”, which convinced the Puritans back to Puritanism. Furthermore, he utilizes descriptive imagery, in this quote “The pit is prepared, the fire is made ready, the furnace is now hot, ready to receive them, the flames do now rage and glow.” (pg. 155) Edwards portrays the flames in the furnace “the flames do now rage and glow” that brought fears to the Puritans, which persuaded them to be devoted to God. He also uses metaphor in this quote, as he contrasts hell, with a furnace to create fear to the Puritans, which help Edwards convince them to return to their congregations. Through the utilization of powerful imagery, Edwards successfully converted them back to their congregations.
Jonathan Edwards creates fear in the Puritans with loaded diction, to persuade them to convert to Puritanism. For example, he utilizes horrific diction in the quote “The wrath of God burns against them, their damnation does not slumber, the pit is prepared, the fire is made ready, the furnace is now hot, ready to receive them, the flames do now rage and glow.” (pg. 153) Through his utilization of horrific diction

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