Essay about Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas

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Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass It is the narrative by Frederick Douglass that unveils the truly evil face of slavery. He writes of some of the most ghastly and inhuman practices and the total denial of justice to the slaves. In the track of his Narrative, he tells of two instances of lethal brutality, --in one of which a planter intentionally and consciously shot a slave belonging to an adjoining plantation, who had accidentally gotten inside his lordly domain in search of fish; and in the other, a supervisor blew out the brains of a slave who had escaped to a brook of water to get away from a bloody scourge. Mr. DOUGLASS affirms that in neither of these cases was any thing done by way of officially authorized arrest or legal …show more content…
I do not remember to have ever met a slave who could tell of his birthday. They seldom come nearer to it than planting-time, harvest-time, cherry-time, spring-time, or fall-time. A want of information concerning my own was a source of unhappiness to me even during childhood. The white children could tell their ages. I could not tell why I ought to be deprived of the same privilege. I was not allowed to make any inquiries of my master concerning it. He deemed all such inquiries on the part of a slave improper and impertinent, and evidence of a restless spirit. The nearest estimate I can give makes me now between twenty-seven and twenty-eight years of age. I come to this, from hearing my master say, some time during 1835, I was about seventeen years old. 1 In Chapter 2, he relates his thoughts to the readers that represent the mental tumult he is subjected to because of his destiny. He writes, Every tone was a testimony against slavery, and a prayer to God for deliverance from chains. The hearing of those wild notes always depressed my spirit, and filled me with ineffable sadness. I have frequently found myself in tears while hearing them. The mere recurrence to those songs, even now, afflicts me; and while I am writing these lines, an expression of feeling has already found its way down my cheek. To those songs I trace my first glimmering conception of the dehumanizing character of slavery. I can never get rid of that conception. Those songs still follow

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