In this essay, I am going to write about the social and historical

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In this essay, I am going to write about the social and historical
context of Of Mice and Men, and how the dreams of certain people in
the ranch went wrong and ended in tragedy.

In this essay, I am going to write about the social and historical
context of 'Of Mice and Men', and how the dreams of certain people in
the ranch went wrong and ended in tragedy. Most of the characters in
'Of Mice and Men' admit, at one point or another, to dreaming of a
different life. Before her death, Curley's wife confesses her desire
to be a movie star. Crooks allows himself the for the fantasy of
hoeing a patch of garden on Lennie's farm one day, and Candy latches
on desperately to George's vision of owning a couple of acres.

John Steinbeck
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It shows the reader to believe in the possibility of the
freedom it promises. The dream of owning a farm was their great
American dream, which the hopeful couple expected to become a reality.
They were inspiring success for their dream because they were
different from the others, as George explains to Lennie in the novel "Guys
like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world.
They got no family. They don't belong no place…With us it ain't like
that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn
about us."

Lennie's innocence raises him to a pure goodness. His passion for the
vision of their future farm proves communicable as he convinces
George, Candy, Crooks that such dream might be possible. However,
Lennie is a character whom Steinbeck sets up for disaster, a character
whose innocence only to ensure him destruction. George wanted freedom
to live in safety and comfort with Lennie, free from the people like
Curley and Curley's wife, who suppose to exist only to cause trouble
for them. Lennie is responsible for George's belief in this safe
world, but eventually the nature of the world asserts itself and
George can no longer maintain that belief. By shooting Lennie, George
spares his friend's death that would be delivered by Curley, but he
also puts his own dream into rest of a perfect world.

One of the book's major themes revolves around Candy. The old
handyman, left with only one hand as the…

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