Essay about Fighting the Cost of College Tuition

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Fighting the Cost of College Tuition

College tuition is a hot topic these days. For a long time, people did not pay much attention to tuition. Today, things are changing. More and more, people are realizing how high tuition has gotten and now they want that to change. In the following essay, I have tried to tackle a very difficult topic. The problem with this topic was that, during research, I found that almost all of the information regarding it was attack after attack on the college administrations. I found no writings by college administrators even attempting to defend themselves. I discovered the awful truth about how much college tuition had gotten out of control over the years.

I walked around campus in a
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To put these figures into perspective, we can compare them with other rising costs during the same 10-year period. For example: medical care costs rose 117%, new home costs went up 90%, and the cost of a new car went up a mere 37%; meanwhile, median family income only grew by 73% (Hood, 10).

Those who can afford these outrageous prices, can usually also ignore it. As for the rest of us, when every penny counts, you want to know where every penny is going. College administrators continually give us vague answers by telling us that it is all due to rising costs. "What costs," you ask? Well, conveniently enough, a "cost" is anything the college chooses to spend it's money on (Sowell, 16). In his article "Why College Tuition Costs So Much," Dr. Thomas Sowell believes that administratorsÆ claims that tuition does not cover the full cost of an education are not valid, pointing out that "there is no more reason why tuition should cover all the costs of a college than there is for magazine subscriptions to cover all the costs of producing a magazine (18)." Research is to a college what advertisers are to a magazine (Sowell, 18).

So where are these rising "costs" coming from? Well, college faculty is one source. Although average faculty salaries were about the same in 1990 as they were in 1970, the number of faculty members increased by 76% (Hood, 11). Meanwhile, total student enrollment had only grown by

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