Essay on Eating Disorders

1014 Words 5 Pages
CRAM Exclusive
Essay Sample
In response to the enormous level of exposure and pressure exhibited by the mass media, it is apparent as to why many people are and remain highly displeased with their body size. Although the media has provided us with substantial evidence to suggest that they are accountable for the steady rise in eating disorders one must not mistake it for being the only cause since eating disorders arise from several interacting complex issues which this essay will go on to discuss. A second factor known

middle of document…

The social comparison theory proposed by Festinger (1954 in Roberts & Good, 2010) asserts that individuals have a natural tendency to compare themselves to one another whether they score high in neuroticism or low in neuroticism (in Roberts & Good, 2010). An upward comparison is thought to occur when one compares themselves to one that beholds extreme beauty may it be real or imagined (in Roberts & Good, 2010). In contrast, a downside comparison occurs when one compares themselves to someone that is lower or worse off than them (in Roberts & Good, 2010). Myers & Crowther (2009, in Roberts & Good, 2010) came to demonstrate that these social comparisons produced adverse effects on both men and women’s body esteem (in Roberts & Good, 2010). As expected, highly neurotic individuals engage mostly in upward comparisons when confronted with idealised images creating high levels of body dissatisfaction thus leading to the occurrence of eating disorders (in Roberts & Good, 2010). Conversely, low neurotic individuals experience downside comparisons (Martin & Kennedy, 1993; Van der Zee et al., 2003; in Roberts & Good, 2010). The phenomenon of an upward comparison has also been illustrated in individuals bearing eating disorder symptoms whilst also displaying characteristics of a neurotic (Cassin & Ranson, 2005; in Roberts & Good, 2010).
Moreover, self-report measures assessed neurotic individual’s level of self-esteem and revealed that their
CRAM Exclusive
Fruit82704Game

Related Documents

  • Male Eating Disorders Essay

    with depression, anxiety, and obsessive/compulsive disorders. (Crosscope-Happel, Hutchins, & Hayes, 2000) Studies have shown that over one million males are affected with anorexia nervosa yearly. (Crosscope-Happel, Hutchins, & Hayes, 2000) Some have suggested that these numbers are on the rise as the media continues to assert a more and more unattainable goal of beauty on the public. The majority of the population suffering from eating disorders is female, so lets look at the general prototype

    Words: 2576 - Pages: 11
  • Essay about Eating Disorders

    There is no single cause for eating disorders. Although eating disorders were once thought to be strictly psychological illnesses, recent research indicates that some people may have a genetic predisposition toward eating disorders. Studies also show that there is often a connection between eating disorders and other illnesses such as clinical depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disease Eating disorders are complex conditions that arise from a combination of

    Words: 998 - Pages: 4
  • Essay on Eating Disorders

    People, however, do not know how to either identify eating disorders before it becomes too late or understand eating disorders. Anorexia is known as the “rich girl’s” disease. Anorexia was defined in the 1870s since it started to be noticed among rich adolescent women (Myers 478). Anorexia nervosa is defined as when a normal-weight person diets and becomes at least 15 percent or more underweight yet still feels fat so continues to starve himself or herself (Myers 479). Starting as the beginning

    Words: 2250 - Pages: 9
  • Essay on Eating Disorders

    Eating disorders usually begin before the age of twenty. In a ten year study conducted by the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, ten Percent of all the participants reported that their anorexia or bulimia started before they were ten years old; thirty-three percent reported the onset between the ages of eleven and fifteen, and forty-three percent reported an onset between the ages of sixteen and twenty (DeFresne).      Anorexia and bulimia have serious physical

    Words: 1420 - Pages: 6
  • Eating Disorders Essay

    important to remember that the continued behaviors of Eating Disorders can lead to many physical problems, further emotional difficulties, and even death. Keep in mind there isn't a lot you can do overall, as an "outsider" to a close family member or friend suffering from an Eating Disorder. It is up to the individual suffering to decide they are ready to deal with the emotional issues in their life that have lead them to their Eating Disorder. They need to make a choice for recovery and to want

    Words: 1357 - Pages: 6
  • Essay about Eating disorders

    Culture messages that glamorize thinness play an essential role, and the disorders can run in families. Many women who develop an eating disorder have been sexually abused or are depressed. They may have a lack of self-confidence, low self-esteem, or a tendency to be compulsive, which is then channeled into dieting and exercise. My personal experience with an eating disorder started at a young age. When I was nine years old, I was taking several dance classes. One day at the end of class, my ballet

    Words: 585 - Pages: 3
  • Eating Disorders Essay

    yet this is what they see. As humans we have a need for other’s approval. Sadly, people turn to this unhealthy form of trying to be fit to fit in. Society is beginning to make this issue more real to the public. It’s exposing the harshness of eating disorders on tv, social media, and billboards which are what needs to be seen. People need to know what they are putting other people through. We aren’t socialized to respond to it. Our society is so hypocritical, we look and say “that person needs help”

    Words: 810 - Pages: 4
  • Essay on Eating Disorders

    while those with Compulsive Eating can be slightly underweight. Variations for all who suffer can be anywhere from extremely underweight to extremely overweight to anywhere in between. The outward appearance of anyone with an Eating Disorder does NOT dictate the amount of physical danger they are in, nor does is determine the emotional conflict they feel inside. They need not display even close to all of the symptoms to be in danger. There are many other eating disorders that are very dangerous as

    Words: 2025 - Pages: 9
  • Symptoms of Eating disorders Essay

    causes the destruction of teeth and gums, as well as the yellowed fingers (Eating 1). People who have bulimia often have other psychological problems as well . In a study performed by the McLean Hospital, 94% of bulimics had another psychological disorder other than the eating disorder itself (Update 1). There are many signs to look for in bulimics, but it is often hard to distinguish different eating disorders (Eating 1). There are certain signs that help point towards bulimia. A person who suffers

    Words: 1710 - Pages: 7
  • Eating Disorders Essays

    Bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, and binge eating, also called compulsive overeating, are three major categories of eating disorders that often infest college campuses around the world. Usually anorexics are skinny but see themselves as being fat. Therefore they starve themselves until they are practically skin and bones. The anorexic will still feel that she is fat no matter how skinny she gets. Undoubtedly, “she denies herself food, she denies she has a problem, she denies she’s emaciated and

    Words: 1442 - Pages: 6