Comparing poems A Parental Ode to My Son Aged Three Years and Five Months, Catrin, and For Heidi With Blue Hair

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Comparing poems A Parental Ode to My Son Aged Three Years and Five Months, Catrin, and For Heidi With Blue Hair

'A Parental Ode…' is a poem, which has been written about a son through his father's eyes. It is a poem emphasizing the beauty and virtues of his son, talking as if he is a creature of fantasy; though in reality the father's son is a mischievous child, getting into trouble, which is distracting the father from writing his poem. 'Catrin' is written in the same format as 'A Parental Ode…' but in this poem it is the mother viewing her child (which in this case is Catrin). This poem is a lot more serious and down to earth. It talks about their relationship and how they have grown together
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To show you what I mean here is the first stanza of the poem:

Thou happy, happy elf!

(But stop - first let me kiss away the tear)

Thou tiny image of myself!

(My love, he's poking peas into his ear!)

Thou merry, laughing sprite!

With spirits feather-light,

Untouched by sorrow and unsoiled by sin -

(Good heavens! The child is swallowing a pin!)

As you can see the brackets are used to show the comparison between the poem the father is writing and what is actually going on. This gives you two different contrasts, two moods, and two different styles of writing; this is what gives its humour. Not only that but of you look a bit deeper into the poem you will see that what is also humorous about the poem is that the father got so distracted at what the child was doing that he actually write it down. This is shown in the juxtaposition of the lines, which creates the humour for this poem, as each line is contradicting one another. The poet, T. Hood, has deliberately used very flowery and sentimental styles of writing to mock the Victorian poets of his time; such phrases like 'Thou happy, happy elf!', 'Thou little tricksy puck!' and 'Thy father's pride and hope!' show this. The language in these phrases is what he is mocking and does this by comparing I to the phrases in the brackets; '(He's got a

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