Charlotte Bronte Essay

656 Words 3 Pages
“Nineteenth-century Britain has been described as the ‘first industrial nation’ (Mathias 1983)” (Guy. 2011: 13). Britain’s industrialisation during the eighteenth and nineteenth-century brought about significant changes transforming society as the technological advancements affected all aspects of life, that of social, political and economic circumstances. In particular the modern advancements of steam power technology expanded the industrial processes of printing which stimulated the economic growth within the writing industry, this marked the era of the novel.
Through the innovations of technology, scenes on the domestic, intellectual as well as the industrial front dramatically began to change, which provoked nineteenth-century
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It is a novel exploring the unspoken hidden depths of repression and frustration of the female subject. Charlotte Bronte presents “female insanity in its social context, and as a reaction to the limitations of the feminine role itself. Unmarried middle-class women, for example, were widely considered a social problem by the Victorians” (Showalter. 1987: 61).
From the very outset ‘Jane Eyre’ does not fit into the feminine ideal of Victorian society. She is marginalised during her childhood and represented by claims to madness. For example ‘Eyre’ is referred to as a ‘mad cat’ and ‘wicked,’ after her emotional displays of animalistic aggressive behaviour towards her abusive cousin ‘Master John’ (Bronte. 1992: 5-7). Her characteristics are portrayed to show her as uncontrollable, disobedient and unruly, exemplified in the lines of the second chapter by the maid ‘Bessie’ “If you don’t sit still, you must be tied down” (Bronte. 1992: 7). ‘Eyre’ is subsequently locked away in the ‘red-room’ at ‘Gateshead,’ descriptions of which represent the very nature of her situation symbolising anger and victimisation of her ‘orphan status’ (Brennan. 2010: 36). The ‘red-room’ illustrates ‘Eyre’s’ “alternative escape

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