A Comparison of The Charge of the Light Brigade, Dulce Et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth

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A Comparison of The Charge of the Light Brigade, Dulce Et Decorum Est and Anthem for Doomed Youth

The attitudes of poets towards war have always been articulated vigorously in their poetry, each poet either condoning or condemning war, and justifying their attitudes in whatever way possible. I aim to explore the change in the portrayal of war before and during the twentieth century, and also the structures and devices poets use to express their views persuasively, and substantiate them. These three poems describe war, and scenes from war, with varying levels of intensity and reality from differing viewpoints.

I am going to make a comparison between the three poems: 'The Charge of the Light
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The poet uses the technique of 'repetition' to emphasize the length of the charge as it mimics the idea of galloping horses. It also illustrates the necessity and enthusiasm of war. The heroic command in the first stanza, which is repeated for effect in the second stanza, grabs the attention of the reader without giving them time to question the futility of the gesture: 'Forward the Light Brigade!', 'Charge for the guns!' He uses noble sounding metaphors like 'the valley of Death', 'the jaws of Death, 'the mouth of Hell', to describe the fate that awaits the soldiers. He does not convey the gory reality of the slaughter in all its blood and thunder.

In the third, fourth, and fifth stanzas, Tennyson takes us into the valley. 'Cannon to the right of them, cannon to the left of them, cannon in front of them', showing us that the enemies have surrounded them. 'Volleyed at with shot and shell', displays the full impact of being in the valley and bombarded with cannon shells and bullets. Tennyson creates a feeling of exhilaration, of the nobility of warfare with his use of poetic techniques, such as rhetorical repetition: 'Cannon to the right of them, cannon to the left of them, cannon in front of them', and the combined technique of onomatopoeia and alliteration: 'Stormed at with shot and shell, while

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