A Comparison between Nineteen Eighty-Four and Brave New World

2442 Words Feb 17th, 2005 10 Pages
1984 And Brave New World

In Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxley's Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to practice them. Neither are passionate nor creative in factors such as love, language, history and literature. Our society today, in general, is unsure about the future: The nightmare of total organization has emerged from the safe, remote future and is
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The use of soma, the perfect drug, acts as a negative replacement for familial bonds. When an individual cannot cope with the daily stresses of life they rely on soma, to turn their stress into an illusion. This acts as a substitute to dealing with their problems, rather than relying on family for support or advice. Soma is an "euphoric, narcotic, pleasantly hallucinant… a holiday from reality." It leaves the individual with unresolved issues and results in an illusioned life; this is not fair to the family, who has to deal with the individual's reliance of the narcotic. Soma has a negative effect on familial bonds, and contributes to the achievement of a perfect sate, which is unrealistic. Authority, in the novels Brave New World and Nineteen Eighty-Four have an immense effect over one's identity and individualism, leading to a dystopic state. This great lack of individuality is due to the conditioning process on the children, and the maintaining of a stable environment. In Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxley's Brave New World everyone is identical. Huxley writes about the loss of human individuality. "Twelve of them ready to be made one, waiting to come together, to be fused, to lose their twelve separate identities in a larger being." Each citizen loses power and pride in their own identity. Every human being, in both utopian worlds, is conditioned to fit society's needs. In Brave New World, the DNA of a embryo

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