Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God

1100 Words 5 Pages
Zora Neale Hurston’s book, Their Eyes Were Watching God, has powerful messages that convey how strong she was and how she overcame adversity to obtain the American Dream. She influenced many soon-to-be writers and people because of her notorious attitude to never give up or have peoples sinister words bring her down. She strived to be a significant leader (unlike most of the trivial people she knew). Zora’s eventful past was infused with memories, lessons, and pain to make her the person she was. Without those experiences she would have never influenced this many people through her words, actions, books, or attitude. Zora always took pride in her heritage regardless of what people said or thought about them: such as “the mule of …show more content…
She effected writers and people so they could be proud of who they are and speak their minds. Zora provides the reader with the theme of pride in her book Their Eyes Were Watching God. In the book the nanny talks about a deeper meaning to pride in human spirit as she explains to Janie that black man are not dominant. She says, “nothing can stop you from wishin” (Hurston 16), she want Janie to follow her dreams even if people say it is only for white man. When Janie finds out that Tea Cake is dead she “couldn’t imagine it was really happening” (Hurston 178), Janie looks up “into the sky and hopes to God it wouldn’t be true” (Hurston 178), Janie’s worst nightmare is happening and all she can do is pray and know that Tea Cake will be out of his excruciating pain and be in heaven. This parallels to Zora’s life because even though her mother died, she had to mature at a young age and know things can only get better from here on. Race is a major theme in Their Eyes Were Watching God. When the black man got home and the sun goes down it was “time to near things and talk… the sitters had been tongueless, eyeless, and earless” (Hurston 1), being criticized was how they felt when the sun was up so they did not speak, nor did they look at any of the white man, but at the end of the day it was time for them to speak they way they wanted to. Zora and Janie resemble each other because like Zora, Janie …show more content…
One of her hardships was after her mother died her father remarried and sent Zora off to school and wanted the school to adopt Zora. Her dad was not there for her when she needed him most, so she took control and “held a number of jobs” (“Zora Neale Hurston”), which gave her strength to be independent and not have people push her around. Many stories in Zora’s book was from life experiences; she used unusual techniques to show what happened to them and many people criticized her for it. Her frequent “crudeness and Bawdiness” (“Zora Neale Hurston”) of the repulsive tales she told were attacked, ridiculed, and caused many strife’s between the blacks and whites. This only made her more determined to prove the world that black people have something more to offer than just being a communal servant. Zora Neale Hurston induced many people and soon-to-be writers all across the country. She helped give people a voice when no one was brave enough to speak up. Alice Walker “revived Zora’s work” (“Zora Neale Hurston: Overview”), Their Eyes Were Watching God, she got people to read it and it became a “model of Womanist Writing”, new writers and readers discover and appreciate Zora’s contributions.

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