Zara Identity Analysis

1367 Words 6 Pages
The creation of mass production, by way of Henry Ford’s introduction of the assembly line, catapulted the world into a realm of mass standardization, establishing a platform for lower production costs and a virtually homogeneous society. Nearly identical homes, vehicles and footwear ultimately sparks the need for practices that aid in perpetuating one’s own individuality. Physicality, for example, is one of the few palpable means of conveying personal identity. With mass production, fashion companies are able to produce affordable clothing that is able to double as indicators of one’s personal identity. However, large fashion corporations face a quandary as a result of fast fashion’s need to produce new clothing weekly. Zara, one of the world’s …show more content…
Self identity creates differentiation amongst society. It is through one’s physical appearance — specifically personal style in regards to clothing— that identity is able to become both palpable and shareable with the general public. The creative industries are defined by three components: “[one,] human creativity; [two], they are vehicles for symbolic messages…and [three], they contain… some intellectual property that belongs to an individual or a group” (Davies and Sigthorsson, 1). The fast fashion industry satisfies this definition through providing the masses with highly accessible clothing that aids in differentiating one from his/her peers. Subsequently, when one’s values, beliefs and preferences are at the forefront of decision making, clothing can function as a “visual metaphor for identity” (Davis, 25). Richard Florida notes that there is a “strong correlation between self-expression and creativity” (249). Therefore, due to the fact that fast fashion encourages self expression, and is tailored to a multitude of people by means …show more content…
As a result of the company’s highly flexible production and high product differentiation, consumers are able to easily access fashionable clothing that in turn, serve as a creative outlet for illustrating aspects of one’s identity. However, by way of the implications of Zara’s practices, such as the maltreatment of off-shored workers and negative environmental effects, the overlap of creativity and commerce in the fast fashion industry is proven to be perplexing. Whilst Zara seeks to provide products that allow the expression of self, the prospect of collateral damage expose the facade of fast fashion. As a result of such, those involved in the creative industries, notably the fashion industry, must explore whether sustainability and fast fashion are able to co-exist, or if the practices of one will serve only to diminish the viability of the

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