Youth Unemployment and Implication for Political Stability in Nigeria (1999-2011)

2176 Words Jan 6th, 2013 9 Pages
YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT AND IMPLICATION FOR POLITICAL STABILITY IN NIGERIA (1999-2011)

YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT AND IMPLICATION FOR POLITICAL STABILITY IN NIGERIA (1999-2011)

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY
In Nigeria, civil rule has been restored for over a decades ago, which has given people so much hopes and expectations for political stability to enjoy the value of democratic rule. For instance, it is assumed that with democracy, people would be free to choose their leaders and representatives and hold them accountable for the overall objective of fast tracking development and improving the general living conditions of the masses. This expectation is not misplaced considering that
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There is an enduring societal biased attitude against technical and vocational education (Damachi, 2001). A large number of job seekers lack practical skills that could enhance self - employment. That is why rather than providing jobs for others, the graduate unemployed persons keep depending on the government and the non – vibrant private sector for job offers.
Another crucial factor that has elicited unemployment problem overtime is the demise of the small scale and cottage industries – which operated in both formal and informal sectors. Following the introduction of the Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) in September 1986 that ushered in liberalization, deregulation and the devaluation program of the domestic currency, many of the teething domestic firms collapsed. That resulted in the loss of many jobs and thereby rendering many people unemployed. Although, these policies were designed to jump - start the growth of the economy, but given the structure of the Nigerian economy, some of the policy packages became out rightly inimical to the system due to their untimeliness.
The agricultural sector has been the leading provider of employment in Nigeria especially in the sixties and in the seventies when the sector provided employment for more than 60 percent of the Nigerian population. However, unfortunately, in

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