Assimilation In 'How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents'

Decent Essays
• Hook: Assimilation is a difficult process that, cannot take place without understanding the language, making it controlled by how much of the language is understood. Yolanda struggles with language because of the lack of assistance with language through her assimilation process.
• Thesis: In How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Yolanda struggles with language and being able to communicate with others. There is a language barrier for Yolanda not only when she is in United States, but there is language barrier that has developed for Yolanda between her and her family when she visits the Dominican Republic.
• Body 1: Language barrier when Yolanda is talking to the police o Women who was sexually assaulted o Yolanda struggling with the police
 “She wasn’t sure what a vehicle
…show more content…
• When back in the Dominican Republic she finds it difficult communicate with others because of the language barrier that has developed o It even makes her nervous at times to communicate with others
• Body 3: language barrier when Yolanda is talking to her family o Yolanda struggles to communicate with her aunts in Spanish, especially when they use certain words specific to their culture, and has even lost her accent
 “’what’ an antojo?’ Yolanda asks. See! After so many years away, she is losing her Spanish”(Alverez 8).
• This is a gap between her and her family that wasn’t there before giving her less of a connection with not only her family but with her culture
• Conclusion: o Over time her struggle with language increases, making it more difficult of communicate with loved ones and forge new meaning relationships that can last a long time
 This creates an internal conflict with her

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