Yoga And Anxiety

1726 Words 7 Pages
As life stressors continue to increase in everyday society, anxiety levels and generalized anxiety disorders also increase. In the United States, anxiety is one of the most common mental illnesses and impacts over 40 million adults; as one in 10 Americans take antidepressants to treat this disorder, it is essential that individuals have other forms of treatments or modalities besides medications (ADAA, 2015). One modality that continually keeps growing in popularity for mental health is yoga. Therefore, determining if yoga could potentially improve individual’s anxiety levels could serve as another concrete beneficial form of treatment. First of all, anxiety is defined as a feeling that can be normal when reacting to specific life stressors …show more content…
Right now, yoga is practiced by 20 million people in the United States and deals with the “profound mysteries and essential nature of the human being in relation to the universe” (Leeming, 2010). Yoga largely balances the body with the mind and breath work through a means of using varios breathing practices, specific flexibility and empowering postures, and mediation. Yoga has been known as the integration between the universal and individual soul. Yoga originated in India and has progressed overtime into different practices including: “bhakti yoga, the yoga of devotion, karma the yoga of selfless service, jnana yoga, the yoga of wisdom, the raja yoga” (Leeming, 2010). There are a lot of different forms of yoga that is practiced throughout the world, which makes it beneficial to practice. These many forms of yoga were researched, studied, and analyzed to determine if yoga could potentially serve as a more concrete additional form of treatment for …show more content…
PubMed, Medline, and PsycInfo were analyzed using the keywords “yoga” and “mood and anxiety disorders” and all articles up until 2008 were gathered (Silva, 2009). After analyzing all of the data, yoga stood superior in 25% of the studies with specific anxiety disorders including: examination and performance anxiety, anxiety neurosis, OCD, snake phobia, Tsunami survivors, and psychoneurosis (defined as: “emotional disturbances caused and maintained by psychological or environmental factors”) (Silva, 2009). Research into yoga for managing specific anxiety disorders is more limited, but all of the studies (two RCTs, two open trials, three non-randomized studies, and one case series) that included adult populations displayed that yoga (either as the single or conjoint form of therapy) may benefit anxiety conditions (Silva,

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