Yellow Wallpaper Conclusion

Great Essays
The larger Implications at the conclusion of the story (“The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman)
"The Yellow Wallpaper" it is a semi-autobiographical short story written by Perkins Gilman in which he describes the treatment of women by Dr. Silas Weir Mitchell the husband, who was the famous doctor. During the rest of the story, it describes how a woman is submissive and childlike obedience to male-dominated society during this twentieth century. The ending of the story it has some of the larger implications to the narrator.
At the beginning, the way the narrator identifies herself as the woman that she has been trapped behind the "bars" of the yellow wallpaper around herself. This is made clear that the action circling in her room
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Within the situation of this larger defeat, however, are smaller losses that conspire to block her mind. She undergoes a loss virtually instantly upon arriving at the estate when she wishes that she and her husband, John to use the small, attractive bedroom on the first floor rather than the spacious upstairs nursery with the yellow wallpaper on the second floor. As the story progresses she is defeated on several points such as the question as to whether or not she can go visit the inspiring "Cousin Henry and Julia" or if they, in turn, may visit her. On several other occasions, she is similarly defeated on the issue of relocating downstairs. Submissive to the room she requests her husband if they can remove the yellow wallpaper; at first he accepts she looks to have gained a small triumph but this is virtually immediately taken from her when he changes his mind and resolves to amuse her "fancy" on this point would open the door to all manner of requests. His reluctance to converse with his wife means that she will always grieve loss in her opinions with him because his key role as the husband will always outdo her submissive female …show more content…
Resolutely rooted in the authoritarian belief of husband's treating their wives as slight more than children and housekeepers that prevailed in Gilman's time, John refuses to consider his wife's nervous condition an illness; rather it is an aberration of her tendency to hysteria and an overactive imagination that she can only surmount by reason. This tendency to dismiss his wife's illness as simply the fancy of a childlike mind plays out with disastrous consequences. She tried to request her husband, John to be permissible to leave the house this ends with tears and he absolutely infantilizes her by carrying her upstairs, putting her to bed and reading to her. By removing all traces of responsibility and self-determination from his wife, John utterly fails her as a

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