Yellow Power Movement Essay

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In 1971, a landmark Supreme Court case, Guey Hung Lee v. Johnson, desegregated Chinese public schools, and reassigned students to other schools. At the time, Asian parents protested the move, because in the Asian schools, students could learn about their cultural heritage. The early 70s built on the political gains from the 60s with the election of Norman Minetta as mayor of San Jose, California, and Marion Lacadia Obera became the first Filipina American to be appointed judge to the Los Angeles bench. In 1974, March Fong Eu became the first Asian American woman ever elected to a state constitutional office in the United States, when she was elected California 's secretary of state. Responding to a large presence of experienced Filipino …show more content…
from Vietnam, Kampuchea, and Laos, as the movement was moving away from the Yellow Power period. Society was evolving, modernizing (e.g., cable TV, video games, VCR’s, microprocessor, floppy disk, ink-jet and laser printers, and Ethernet), and it was also during this period that the term "Asian Pacific American” was born. But, the Yellow Power movement had succeeded in bringing a common racial/panethnic identity to the various Asian American factions, and in 1978 the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation to proclaim an Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week in …show more content…
With the Asian-Pacific population expected to grow fourfold by the year 2050, the APA movement is well-positioned to meet future challenges, and has a permanent seat at the political table. Spread across the country, with interest in all aspects of American life, the APA has shed the lowly “immigrant” label, with most Asian-Pacific Americans U.S. born, and educated. The radical Yellow Power movement of the 60s, has given way to such organizations as the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and the Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional

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