Yeats Journey Of The Magi Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… In line 2, Ireland, the falcon, has been detached from England, the falconer, so much, that the falcon cannot even hear the falconer, denoting the wrongs England exhorts on Ireland. (www.en.utexas.* 1) The Russian Revolution, another political turmoil of the day, also influenced Yeats: it occurred about a year or less before he wrote the poem. The Russian Revolution, which Yeats believed equaled, if not eclipsed the impact and effects of the French Revolution of 1789, in conjunction with other coinciding incidents led Yeats to the conclusion that the "ceremony of innocence is drowned," (Keane 64). For Yeats the "blood-dimmed tide," washing upon the shores of the whole world, drowning the ceremony of innocence, targeted fanatic men like Lenin, who had seized power around the continent ("the worst/ Are full of passionate intensity,") (Unterecker …show more content…
Eliot's opening (paraphrased) quotation of Lancelot Andrewes's, serves as a means by which to stimulate the magus' memory, after which the magus takes over the storytelling. (Raffel 102) Although the quotation itself expresses a narrative tone , it also initiates the cold and caustic environment which Eliot further develops throughout the first stanza ("A cold coming we had of it,/ Just the worst time of year"). The remainder of the first stanza, in a vitriolic tone, describes the magus' harsh journey. The magus criticizes his previous life in hindsight ("men cursing and grumbling/ and running away, and wanting their liquor and women,"), but while traveling, he regrets having left that life. This prior life reflects the life of the "roaring twenties," the era during which Eliot wrote the poem. Eliot's sardonic tone expresses the contempt he now feels for the life he previously led, the way of life the majority of people led at that time. The 1920's in the United States brought about an inordinate amount of wealth, and the overwhelming success of that decade resulted in a social revolution unparalleled up until that time. Both Eliot and Yeats critique revolutions occurring at the time they wrote their poems, but whereas Yeats …show more content…
His thinking leads him to question his actions and their results, and he apparently becomes conscience of the vagueness of the situation. Readers are left with a paradox: how was it possible that the magus simultaneously witnessed a Birth and a Death. The magus' thought process methodically leads the reader through the steps to Eliot's theme: death is the way to rebirth. The magus first acknowledges that he witnessed both a death and birth, then concludes that death and birth must be connected to some extent ("I . . . had thought [birth and death] were different; this birth was/ Hard . . . for us, like Death, our

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