Xenotransplantation Essay

2045 Words 9 Pages
One concept that always transpires in today’s society is progression. In today’s community, people are always striving for ways to solve our issues and problems. In the medical field, doctors have begun the practice of xenotransplantation. Xenotransplantation is the process of grafting and transplanting organs, cells, and tissues from a different species for human use. If society does end up adopting the use of xenotransplantation, it would become a major sustenance for the supply and demand for human organs to be transplanted. However, xenotransplantation has many concerns such as organ rejection, disease transmission, religious conflicts, identity, and legal actions that preserve the safety of organizations to be able to practice the procedure. …show more content…
Xenotransplantation has many potential risks such as transmissible diseases, infections, rejection of the organ, and the possibility of starting a plague. Humans can obtain infections by agents like bacteria, viruses, and fungi from xenotransplantation. The disease may be specific to a certain species, but humans may obtain these specific diseases that are derived from the animals through xenotransplantation. Additionally, the xenograft might not function the way we expect it to or reject it when replacing the human organ. After all, animals and humans live in different environments, respectively the organs would function differently compared to each other. Furthermore, the use of large doses of immunosuppressive drugs during the operation of xenotransplantation can make the patient prone to get infections from the air. The use of this drug subdues the immune system, making the patient vulnerable to infections. Xenotransplantation could potentially lead to a world-wide plague. There are controversies that the procedure of xenotransplantation can create a new deadly virus that could result in the next plague. (Bisong …show more content…
For example, the recipient may receive infectious agents that could ignite a world-wide plague. It could be worse than some of the viruses around the world such as Ebola, HIV, and Influenza. Supposing that the surgery of xenotransplantation is successful and would pose no health risks to humans, it would still affect the rights of animals and their ecosystem. Not to mention the religious morals on xenotransplantation: (1) It plays the role of god, (2) It separates the fine line between humans and animals, and (3) It disturbs the natural order god has given for us to play out. There are also consent forms that would have to be made and reviewed by the court of justice to ensure the safety patients. There are so many controversies that revolve around this topic that I believe it will take many more years of research before it can be considered an option at local hospitals. The practice of xenotransplantation still needs to build credibility among the public and reduce the number of potential

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