X-Men Apocalypse Analysis

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X-Men: Apocalypse is the ninth installment in the X-Men series. The movie surrounds the villain Apocalypse, who has just been woken up for the first time in hundreds of years. Upon waking up, he is disappointed to find out that humans are worshiping machinery and buildings rather than mutants. X-Men: Apocalypse can be examined as a complete intertextual reference to the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in the Book of Revelation of Jesus Christ. Not only is it an intertextual echo for the Four Horsemen, but also there are two contrasting theological views of the character Apocalypse himself. Bryan Singer believes that this creation of Apocalypse embodies the God of the Old Testament, but Alissa Walker a theology magazine writer believe that …show more content…
The Four Horsemen were named to be Death, Famine, War and Conquest. X-Men: Apocalypse mirrors this tale spot on. The villain Apocalypse is disgraced by humanity’s obsession with consumerism and believes that they are worshiping material things rather than the real Gods, the mutants. Apocalypse then goes around looking for his Four Horsemen to follow and aid him with the destruction of humanity. Each mutant he chooses is not only powerful in their own way, but closely relates to each of the Four Horseman descriptions. In the Movie, Magneto lost his wife and daughter in the hands of humans, he represents the Horseman of Death. Storm grew up in a poor village where everyone around her was starving, she represents the Horseman of Famine. Quicksilver is a powerful angelic being that wants to be the head honcho of the mutant world. He fights in underground fight clubs and is known to be hungry for power, he is closely related to the Horseman of Conquest. Finally, Psylocke has the ability to form weapons through telekinesis and is portrayed as a warrior throughout the film, she is most closely related to the horseman of War. X-Men uses this biblical tale as the backbone and structure of this …show more content…
She says “Like Satan, Apocalypse’s big problem is that he’s not God: specifically, he’s not omnipresent, and that gets in the way of his plans” (Wilkinson). A valid point that she makes is that in this movie there isn’t one divine figure that can be called God. The accumulation of all the other X-Men is what defeats Apocalypse. This is an interesting point because in classic theological intertextuality there is a definite good and bad guy, but in X-Men they are all mutants therefor everyone has powers but none of them are above one another. With the combination of all their powers they represent a “God” like character in the way that they are able to save

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