Workers During The Gilded Age

Decent Essays
Andrew Carnegie made 480 million dollars through his steelmaking companies. But what did his workers make? Many Americans worked 70 hour’s a week for very little money. Fortunately, now there are laws that have been placed allowing people to stay safe and healthy, but in the 1800s they did not have these laws. Now the average hours of work that an American has is 38.6 hours. Workers during the Gilded Age were treated badly by the capitalists and their management organizations.
During the Gilded Age the industrialists prospered for mostly negative reasons. They drove rivals out of business and raised prices by limiting competition. They robbed the nation of its natural resources and bribed politicians and officeholders to ensure their success.

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