The History Of Worcester's Union Station

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We interact and experience architecture every day. It is physically impossible not to and because of this, it is incredibly easy to take it for granted and to forget about all the thought and care that was taken to create such huge feats. Worcester’s Union Station is located directly off of highway 190 in Worcester, Massachusetts. Thousands of people pass by it on a daily basis without even realizing that it is something more than a “pretty train station”. Before we begin, let’s answer the question of just why are train stations so grand? This can be simply answered with the fact that while trains started to become the main form of transportation, the stations were made bigger and more ornate. Each city put in an exceptional amount of effort, …show more content…
However, just two years after taking up roots, the area was abandoned. By 1684 it would be resettled, and at this point, the settlement would be given the name Worcester. It would be mysteriously abandoned again in 1702. Worcester would not permanently be settled until 1722, and would be later be declared a city in 1848 (Arsenault). Blackstone Canal, engineered by Benjamin Wright in 1828, was the first big technological boost the city would see. Along its banks, factories began springing up from Worcester to Providence. The amazement of the canal was, unfortunately, overshadowed by the invention of the railroad in 1832. Travelling before trains was no easy task for the horse and carriages that would be forced to trek their way through the muddy cobblestoned streets. It should also be noted that Worcester’s population quadrupled between the years 1830 and 1845 …show more content…
Flying was not only a faster means of travel, but also offered a more flexible schedule than that of a train. Both towers were removed in 1926 because of the constant vibrations of the building, and by 1941, the front canopy would also be removed. Eisenhower would sign the International Highway Act in 1956 creating a faster, more direct way of travelling for the automobile. On Saturday, October 24, 1964 at 9:23pm, the last passenger would disembark from Union Station, however, the building would remain vacant until 1972 when it would finally close its doors. Both the interior and exterior were destroyed by the mid 70s. Various offers to buy the building came and went, along with ideas as to how to use the empty space. It would be bought and sold twice without any changes until, finally, being purchased by the Worcester Redevelopment Authority in 1994

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