SECTION 1: The Hippie Movement

Improved Essays
Because of the nature if the war itself the American soldiers were pushed to new limits everyday on the battlefield. For example, because of frustration the Americans dropped nearly 1 million tons of explosive on Vietnam. Media covered brutality between the sides and this also increased the support towards the war. The truth was showed through the pictures and videos about the war and the lives of the American soldiers at war.

Psychologically, the soldiers were also affected. They turned to things they usually wouldn’t to help them get through the struggle. Things like drugs and alcohol were used to help them push through. This is seen in a poem by Chris Woolnough called The Nightmare never ends.
“The Nightmare Never Ends
Close your eyes and go to sleep,
…show more content…
The hippie movement was a very peaceful movement. During the 1960’s the hippies followed morals of democracy, gender equality, non – violence and non – racism. One event that stood out during the hippie movement was Woodstock. Woodstock was a three day music concert. It was held on the 15-18th August, 1969. It was held to protest against the war and those who performed there were also anti –war. However, the hippie movement was not taken too seriously as many saw it as an excuse to create a culture of sex and drugs.

SECTION 2: THE STUDENT MOVEMENT.

During the 1960’s many students felt affected by the war and they felt that they should be heard. A group called The Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was made. It was known for its activism against the Vietnam War. Many marches and protests were done by the SDS during the sixties. Disruptive behaviour was shown at universities to create awareness. The movement showed great courage and formed part of history. When nothing was done the movements became more violent, hoping for a change.

http://old.seattletimes.com/special/centennial/october/art/StudentPower.jpg
Students came together to form unity.

SECTION 3: MILITARY

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Baby Boomer Movement

    • 2504 Words
    • 11 Pages

    There were networks such as the Berkeley Free Speech Movement and the students for a Democratic Society. (1pg3) It was these student organizations that led the antiwar movement during Vietnam. In 1956 when President Johnson put the Vietnam conflict into a full scale air and ground war, the antiwar movement was ignited. By this time there were many well established student organizations on college campuses demonstrating how students could bring about change. In early 1965 when the U.S. began bombing North Vietnam, the pace of protesting escalated.…

    • 2504 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    From the early 1960s and 1970s, there was over 450 colleges protesting Vietnam around the United States. (history.com) There was a plethora of topics that the students protested. Overall, the student protesters made people believe that the Vietnam war was a terrible war and its all the United States fault. Student Protesters protested The Vietnam War because they believe that the war was a civil war between North and South Vietnam. (history.com) The students protested by rallying, teachings, and sometimes mobs to protect their point of view.…

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This unknown increase was also proven after the release of the Pentagon Papers. Many protests broke out and some protesters were killed for professing their dislike for the number of men in the War, which “Ohio” by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young covered and told the horrid stories of the Protests at Kent State. Each song tells a story in its own way, providing its intake on a situation while in song but also gave the people a reason for hope. Music was like a safety beacon for those whose minds were broken during the era of the Vietnam War, doing its best to relate to every type of person. When more men were drafted and more men started to die, more and more people were against the movement and began to understand the worries and anguish that these musicians had for the men in Vietnam.…

    • 1222 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Vietnam War Influence

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Tet Offensive was a turning point of Vietnam War due to the bloodshed and devastation wrought by the heavy fighting, along with the media had a strong influence on the mainstream perspective. It inflamed the growing dissatisfaction of the public with Johnson administration’s policy in Vietnam. Many of the American continued to question the United States whether it was pointless to destroy Vietnam in order to save it which leading to even more anti-war sentiments and protests across the country. Due to the Viet Cong’s Tet Offensive, he lost his approval rate which at that time Nixon came in. President Nixon promised to bring “peace with honor” and started to withdraw military troops, his Watergate scandal ended his term in office.…

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Bob Dylan Vietnam Analysis

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages

    During the Vietnam War, this caused a large part of the population to adjust their opinion about American involvement. Many demonstrations arose and as a result, the military was forced to withdrawn from Vietnam. Because of the fact that we can simply not know how the war and the American opinion would have developed without media interference, we cannot accurately predict the influence the media did have. However, as we have seen for example with not only the Napalm girl but also the reporting on the Tet offensive, the media could certainly alter and even manipulate the public perception of the Vietnam war. The fact that the media was able to provoke a reaction of criticism combined with their ability to alter the perception of a whole nation makes it safe to deduct that the media was an important component during…

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He iterates that millions of Americans were starting to purchase televisions and news stations such as CBS and NBC were receiving their highest ratings because of war-coverage. He says, “Now that people could watch the war, many did not like what they saw. Anti-Vietnam War demonstrations involving hundreds of thousands were becoming a commonplace around the world” (p. 54), to indicate the impact the news media had, worldwide. Kurlansky argues that global student movements are a result from the Vietnamese war and its anti-war movement in the United States. Italian, German, Japanese, and British students were originally protesting the war, which led to protesting other local issues.…

    • 945 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The second physiological influence that led to the hatred of the troops by the U.S citizens was the misunderstanding of the impact that war had on the soldiers themselves. With PTSD not being a fully realized disorder during the sixties, many of the returning soldiers who experienced it were thought to be actual militaristic psychos. “In the late nineteen eighties an in-depth survey of two thousand three hundred and forty-eight Vietnam Veterans found that about thirty percent of them had PTSD at least one time since the wars end” (New York Times, Aug 7 2014). With many of the soldiers enduring this disorder people hated them for being acting strange and being warmongers though they did not know yet that what…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Protests In Vietnam

    • 2482 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The protests played a large part in the failure in Vietnam War because they were affective. In the long run the protests did have an affect on the government and when the war would be ended. Since the protestors really highlighted how flawed the U.S. policy was during this time. There were also other protests that directly put pressure on the federal court system; members of antiwar groups collected more them 1,000 draft cards and brought them to the directly to the Department of Justice in Washington D.C. By doing this protestors overwhelmed the court with cases on the draft and really caught the attention of the government. The antiwar movement caught the attention of the government and put a spotlight on how flawed the U.S. policies were, this played a large role in the government putting a halt to the seeming unending…

    • 2482 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The hippies’ protests affected the U.S. foreign policy in Vietnam and led to the withdrawal of troops and the end of U.S. involvement. Hippies protested for racial equality alongside African Americans during the 1960s. This was because of their shared views such as brotherhood and equality. The counterculture movement paved the way for legislation that allowed racial equality, LGBT rights, and women’s rights - legislation enacted during or shortly after the movement…

    • 581 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Vietnam War lasted from 1954 to 1975. The war was met by a mixed reaction from Americans, with the unpopular opinion being against the war. People of different race, gender and background went against the war and created a movement called the antiwar movement. This movement became one of the biggest social movements in U.S. history. How did the antiwar movement affect American culture?…

    • 1220 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays