Woodrow Wilson As A Hero

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Hero is defined as "a person who is admired for great or brave acts of fine qualities". The concept of hero first came from the Greek. "Warrior who lives and dies in the pursuit of honor" is considered as the definition for a classical hero. In the current word, different countries and races commend for diverse heroes, who sacrifice his or her profits in order to contributed more to the society. Martin Luther King, a progressive civil movement promoter, is considered to be an undeniable hero in the history, because he devoted his entire life in fighting for the equal rights for the blacks, developing a better version of American society, and achieving the American Dream as a whole. Despite of having a controversial experience in prison, Martin …show more content…
An ideal figure, who made considerable contribution to one national, may criticized by another race or country. This is one of the hardest points in narrative of heroification. It is difficult to shape a perfect model for everyone. Woodrow Wilson is considered to be a controversial heroic figure as Loewen mentioned in "Handicapped by History: The Process of Hero-Making." Most Americans respected Woodrow Wilson as a powerful president, who led the Americans to the victory in the World War I. He is heroified for his enthusiasm in promoting the movement of women’s suffrage, playing a significant role in establishes of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Nevertheless, most African American hardly regarded Wilson as a hero. Wilson was a radical racist, who overtly segregated federal government and prevented the blacks from voting in his term. At the time as the principle of the Princeton University, Wilson even discouraged the blacks from admission, depriving their opportunities of gaining high education. The colored group would never praise a racist as an ideal figure for the …show more content…
In the Letter from a Birmingham Jail, King addressed the civil rights movement in the black arguing for the American Dream, stating "We will win our freedom because the sacred heritage of our nation and the eternal will of God are embodied in our echoing demands ... when these disinherited children of God sat down at lunch counters they were in reality standing up for what is best in the American dream and for the most sacred values in our Judeo-Christian heritage, thereby bringing our nation back to those great wells of democracy which were dug deep by the founding fathers in their formulation of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.

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