Woodfibre LNG Case Study

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Woodfibre LNG is planning to build a liquified natural gas (LNG) facility seven kilometres south-west of Squamish. The facility will be a link to the tankers that will bring the LNG to the rest of the world to meet rising energy demand. With the building of this facility there will be a new liquid natural gas pipeline from Greater Vancouver. LNG occurs when natural gas is cooled to -160C° and condensates from a gaseous state to a liquid state. Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon consisting primarily of methane, but it also contains small amounts of ethane, propane, butane and pentanes which are useless to this specific industry. Natural gas is found in deep underground rock formations or associated with other hydrocarbon reservoirs …show more content…
To start the risk of a leak from either one of the holding tanks or the various pipes in and around the facility is a risk that must be taken seriously. A holding tank carries as much as 180 million litres full of LNG, imagine the damage and risk to the workers. On top of that the risk of a fire or explosion from a leak is very large if there is a leak. It is also insane to place LNG facilities on the earthquake-prone U.S. West Coast after the 2011 disaster at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant. The LNG facility uptakes sea water for a great deal of purposes but they use chlorine to disinfect the water then dump it, after they are done with it , back into the ocean. That is one major problem, but there is still a risk of the chlorine holding tank rupturing, leaking, or even adding too much chlorine to the water. The chlorine kills fish, ocean wildlife, also bacteria, and microbes. A leak could cause large damage costs to the surrounding marine …show more content…
But that radius clips summer cabins and permanent residences at least twice throughout its journey through Howe sound. This brings problems which include but are not limited to: people not know about the safety radius, permanent residences being endangered when a tanker goes by, and also summer cabins are in danger. to research done over many years, as the LNG companies have wrongly told us[7], the LNG when leaking from a ship does not just evaporate and float up into the atmosphere. When LNG comes into contact with water it rapidly boils into natural gas, but the natural gas also carries water with it. So it remains near the surface of the water moving like a fog-of-death. There also is the risk of a crash because Howe Sound is so narrow. That would be the worst case scenario. The Woodfibre LNG facility must not be built to stop LNG supertankers from destroying Howe

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