Lord Benedick Women's Survival Analysis

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Women’s Survival
How can a woman not only survive, but keep their interests and individuality intact in a world designed to only benefit men? Shakespeare suggests that innocence, humor, marriage, and love can be used as tools for women to navigate in this difficult world. While Beatrice is the one who takes the most advantage of these tools, other women in the play also participate in using these tools in the hopes of bettering their situations.
The assumption that women are innocent, naïve, childlike beings can usually be a barrier for women. These presumptions make it nearly impossible for women to accomplish anything because they are thought to be incapable of physical or academic labor. It can, however, be redirected and used to women’s
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Using these tolls Beatrice is able to speak poorly Lord Benedick in throughout the first scene of the first act. This is something a woman would not usually be able to get away with. Due to the fact that she is saying these things in a witty manner and is an “innocent and naïve” woman she can get away with it. Even her traditional, straight-laced, and appearance obsessed uncle, Leonato, excuses her behavior; “You must not, sir, mistake my niece. There is a kind of merry war betwixt Signor Benedick and her” (1.1.49-50). Leonato minimize her utterances to nothing more than a petty game. Never the less Beatrice’s stance on Benedick is, despite Leonato’s flippant attitude towards it, is made known, which is more than most women’s would …show more content…
For whether it be in courtship, marriage, or even prostitution, love and sex are a woman’s most powerful, and most dangerous tools. While seduction can help a woman move up the societal ladder, or it can wreck her reputation. Margaret tries to gain a foothold into high society by letting Borachio seduce her. Being the wife, or even the mistress, of a man in high society could change a poor working woman’s life. She is even so bold that “She leans me out at her mistress’ chamber windows,” (3.3.128) to have sex. Unfortunately for Margaret, she was only being used as a pawn in a devious plot against Claudio and Hero. She not only does not become a partner for Borachio, but her reputation is destroyed because she is condemned by her false true love when he’s caught red-handed and interrogated.
Just like all her other exploits, though, Beatrice’s use of love works to her advantage. She convinces Benedick to duel Claudio by declaring that if he doesn’t that it means he doesn’t love her. Even though Benedick loves Claudio like a brother, her agrees to Beatirce’s demands; “Enough, I am engaged, I will challenge him, I will kiss your hand, and so I leave you” (4.1.325-326)
Though there are plenty of disadvantages stacked against women in the world of Much Ado About Nothing there are ways for them to thrive and make their own choices in their lives. While using some of these tools can backfire on them and ruin their

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