Women's Suffrage Essay

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While all types of people have had to endure hardships due to race, economic standing, or religious belief since the dawn of humanity, historically speaking, regardless of a woman’s culture or background they have been the group most victimized. Women are forced to face the same stigmas as their male counterparts in addition to the adversities that accompany femininity in a male dominated world. In the past, women’s power has been seized by men in the name of religion, “science”, and even notions as weak as tradition. With the dawn of the industrial age in the late 1800’s, women saw their roles inside the home changing and this gave them the freedom to begin a metamorphosis from subservient homemakers into eager individuals. With a newfound …show more content…
Prior to the group being founded, women’s suffrage was considered a preposterous idea but thanks to determination and courage of the NAWSA this notion began to crumble. Under the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, the NAWSA launched state level political and social campaigns to gain women’s right to vote. This influenced the minds of some to allow women’s suffrage, but unfortunately not enough. During World War 1, in the absence of men women were left to support the nation; The NAWSA saw this as their chance to prove that women deserved the ability to vote. They seized this opportunity to persuade President Woodrow Wilson to ratify the 19th Amendment in 1920 after decades of fighting for their rights to vote. Even though these groups made vast strides for women’s rights, they had to fight a very hard battle to all but force men to give them these rights. People often forget that women only gained the right to vote less than one hundred years ago, and there is still room for improvement today in the area of gender equality. Thanks to the brave women like Frances WIllard, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony who fearlessly organized within the WCTU and NAWSA women’s roles and ability to choose their own destiny has forever been

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