Women's Roles In The Civil War Essay

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Beginning with the first colonial settlers, the extraordinary conditions and environment of living in the New World began to change ideas about women’s roles and dramatically reshape their lives. Throughout American history, there is a significant amount of evidence that defines the different roles that men and women were expected live by. From Antebellum America’s philosophy of “the cult of true womanhood”1 to the remarkable parts women played in the Civil War, it is evident that the picture of the American woman was changing. This essay addresses only a few examples in which Early American history paved the way for women to evolve and make progress in their constant attempts to be heard and seen as worthy individuals in society. Of the …show more content…
Northern women began voluntary associations such as the United States Sanitary Commission, which not only furnished soldiers with clothing and food but provided them with a few comforts from home such as toiletries, candies, and letters of encouragement from loved-ones.5 A few brave women aided the war effort by taking supplies directly to the frontlines or camps often putting themselves in harm’s way. The labors of these courageous women serving and aiding the Civil War earned them recognition and elaborate praise from society. In contrast, women’s services and contributions to the Revolutionary War, although appreciated by the solders, were hardly recognized and mostly ignored by …show more content…
By persistence and determination Colonial women stepped out of the cult of true womanhood into Antebellum reform and onward, splitting boundary lines between traditional men and women’s roles once dictated by a culture of society. Throughout Early American History women supported and fought the wars that freed a nation, freed a people, and freed themselves. They became the driving forces that helped shape and define a moral compass for their society by organizing reform groups and influencing political powers. In addition, black women (and men) were no longer considered “chattel property” and the long road to civil rights had begun. In conclusion, this essay has examined only a very small number of examples in which women should be considered history makers

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