Women's Roles During WWII

Improved Essays
American women played very important roles during the second World War. While some women supported the war on the homefront, others made there ways overseas.
Befroe the War Prior to contrary belief, World War II was not the first time large nubers of women worked outside of their homes. Before the war, many women worked at jobs that were considered “ ‘traditionally female’ professions” (K.A., 2017). If a woman was married, pregnant, or had children, it was normal for them to leave the workforce all together.
Women’s Roles During the War Women’s roles quickly changed once the United States entered World War II. When the majority of men went off to fight overseas, there was a great need for women to take over many of the men’s jobs on the
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During the war, over five million women entered the workforcehe; the majority of those jobs took place in defense plants and factories across the United States (K.A., 2017). Along with working those jobs and learning to complete men’s household duties [fixing the car, taking care of the yards, and managing the finances], women still found the time to take care of their “normal” roles as wives, mothers, and managers of their households (WWII Museum, 2017).
Women at War World War II was a chance for women to serve in the United States militay, both at home and abroad. Around 350,000 American Woman volunteered to serve in different areas of the military (History, 2017); Women served in each of the following areas: the Women’s Auxiliary Corps, the Navy Women’s Reserve, the Coast Gaurd Women’s Reserve, the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, the Amry Nurse’s Corps, and the Navy Nurse’s Corps (WWII Museum, 2017). While serving, women took up many of the “office” jobs and clerks in the military. Along with office work, many women drove trucks, rigged parachutes, analyzed photographs, repaired airplanes, worked as lab techs., were radio operators, flew aircraft, tested new planes, helped train, and some even worked on/near the frontlines as nurses (WWII Museum,

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