Women's Role Of Women During World War I

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Women were not always equal; they proved themselves worthy of being a true citizen of the United States in World War I. After countless months of helping the country and saving lives, a new respect was found for women and their abilities. Originally, the United States was neutral during World War I, but after German U-boats attacked American ships and Germany tried to ally itself with Mexico, President Wilson and the Congress declared war on Germany. Starting in 1917, the United States was a part of World War I and women were there to help shape the outcome of the war for the United States. At home, women conserved and produced food for the family and soldiers abroad. New opportunities erupted for women in jobs that were traditionally only …show more content…
Most women did not work and if they did, it was normally in the textile industry (Campbell). During World War I, women made uniforms for the soldiers fighting overseas. Munition factories were also another place of labor for them. Ammunition and torpedoes were built by the women in their local area.They also assembled explosives, arms, tools, airplane and railroad parts, and electrical equipment. Oil refineries and brass and copper factories were other locations of work for women. Fortunately for them, they did not have to agree on any work conditions that were not ideal to them. They could simply quit and find another job with ease (Women During World War I). Millions of women filled the job openings left vacant by men in the war. They began to study new professions and start training. Driving and auto mechanics were some examples of things women learned for the first time (Women During World War I). They also helped with sending and interpreting code from telegraphs (Tucker 1269). This disproved the myth of women only being able to work at home and showed that women played salient roles in World War I (Women During World War …show more content…
Most women did not go to college or get professional training because most were never given the opportunity before (Pratt 58). As the war progressed, more and more women wanted to become nurses. M. Adelaide Nutting, Lillian Wald, and Annie Goodrich formed the National Emergency Committee on Nursing to help train women properly. Colleges from coast to coast began to present nursing programs (Nurses in World War I). The role of a nurse is to aid soldiers when necessary. Nurses could not direct orders or attend to military issues. They were given no military rank, but were treated with military discipline. Nurses from America worked at home or abroad in locations such as Great Britain, Belgium, and Italy (Tucker 1271). Although women did not fight in the war directly, they received awards from the United States and France. The Distinguished Service Cross, which is the U.S. Army’s second highest honor, was given to three nurses. The Distinguished Service Medal was given to several women also, which is the highest non-combat honor in the U.S. Army. The French award, Croix de Guerre, was bestowed to many American nurses (Tucker 1271). Thus, showing the great importance of women in World War

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