Women's Role In The Yellow Wallpaper By Charlotte Perkins Gilman

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Women 's Role In Society

“The role of women in society has been greatly overseen in the last few decades, but now are coming to a more perspective to people.” In other words a women 's roles in society is much different today than it was in the past. The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is about a woman who is suffering from nervous depression. Her treatments requires her to do nothing active especially write. The narrator starts to secretly write because it would help her feel better. She writes about her room. The room has many disturbing things, particular the yellow wallpaper because it was revolting to her. When John, who is her doctor and husband, finds out about her writing he takes it away. Now the narrator is left with
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Farhana is a mother of a three year old boy and works sixty hours a week, as a nurse at beaumont hospital. I got an opportunity to sit down with her and ask her how she does it. Farhana shares her secret to living a happy life with a successful family and career. “Now things are gonna get rough but creating a schedule and managing your time can help a lot. It is also important to have someone you can lean on in case of a situation.” Farhana has a set schedule of when she works and when she spends time with her family. She says she misses her social life. Things like going out and partying with her friends are not possible anymore. Women make sacrifices to balance their career and family. Farhana tells me that the role of women in today 's society is better than it was back then. “My mother who is my biggest influence, had no rights or freedom. She would only be focused on her family”. Farhana disagreed with her mom because she believes that it is important for a women to gain her own independence. “I feel like a women shouldn 't feel like they need a man in there life” This interview has taught me how women struggle to balance both the many expectations and demands of marriage and their carers. Also i have learned how it is better for women to manage family and work in today 's society compared to how it was back in the

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