Women's Role In The Revolutionary War Essay

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Today women 's duties in American society have significantly evolved as compared to earlier counterparts living during the era of the Revolutionary War. During the 1700s to early 1800s, single women could own property, execute a contract, prosecute or be prosecuted. However, married women recognized as femme couverte had to give up not only her name but all properties she owned. Married women were not allowed to purchase, sell or convey property to another person. Women handled the household and were required to work towards becoming distinguished homemakers. (Making America) Although women were restricted, this did not discourage them from becoming essential role models and advocates in helping America achieve its freedom. Before and …show more content…
The American Continental Army needed men of all ages to fight in the war. After husband, sons and brothers departed their homes to join the war, women were responsbile for managing the household and dealing with predicaments of inflation, rarity and physical violence in their community and homes. (Berkin, 27) Women took over the responsibilities of managing farms, businesses, raising the children, dealing with shortages of necessities and looting British and American troops. (Berkin 31) British, patriot and loyalist commanders either asked or ordered women to host soldiers in their property and officers in their home. As hostess women were, responsible for providing food, and washing soldiers clothes. Once soldiers departed, the woman would find much of the families resource depleted and her home and property damaged. (Berkin 34 ) Additionally, women had to deal with the possibility of being physically attacked and raped within her own home. Numerous articles printed heinous and barbaric atrocities experienced and faced by women. "Victims of rape and humiliation could not prevent attacks on their property or themselves. With husbands and fathers gone and with children to protect, women knew that resistance would have consequences for lives other than their own. " (Berkin, 41) Protecting themselves, their childrens and their homes was a struggle for many women, but …show more content…
Prior to the start of the Revolutionary War women in Colonial America saw men as the main provider of the house. However, after dealing with many of the responsibilities during the war, women gained a new sense of freedom from men. (Making America, 157). Women debated the traditional opinion that women were inferior to men and could easily make rational and ethical decisions equal to males. (Berkin, 152) These debates soon open doors to women 's formal education. Philadelphia Young Ladies Academy open their doors in 1787 and by 1789, both girls and boys in Massachusetts were provided free public education. This new ear gave women the opportunity to learn math, history, geography and political theory (Making America, 159) that would give women the knowledge to strive to be more than just

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