Women's Role And Effects Of Gender Roles In Society

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Gender Role in Society Gender roles in society have a major influence on inequalities of healthcare, due to gender specific roles prevalent in society. A woman is the main provider of informal child care, disabled and older people. Consequence of this role involves reduced sleep, less leisure time, and increased risk of poverty for women (Nursing Times, 2015). Women who are full time caregivers are highly effected by the majority of poverty (Nursing Times, 2015). Effects of poverty can cause significant consequences both mentally and physically. The female body has been constructed as a medical matter at a higher degree than the male body. Due to the fact of females being more constructed, the female becomes regulated by medical professionals. …show more content…
Participants of studies shown from the 1900 to 2007 shows in 1900 the gap was at 2 years, 1950 5.5 years, 2000 5.4 years, and 2007 5.1 years, with women living longer than men (Harvard Health Publications 2010). Men may be bigger, more muscular, run faster, lift more, and throw things further. Men are the contrary when it comes to healthcare. Men are the weaker sex when it comes to taking care of themselves. More than half of women age sixty-five are widows. Widows outnumber widowers by about three to one. To every one hundred American women there is only seventy-seven men (National Center for Health Statistics). The gender gap is not unique to America. All countries with reliable health statistics report women out living men. Men die faster than women (National Center for Health Statistics). The overall mortality rate is forty-one percent for men than women. Women see doctors more often than men, but men cost our society much more medical care beyond age of sixty-five. They become ill at a younger age and have more chronic illness than women. The health differences between male and female begin during fetal life. It continues from the cradle to the grave. An estimate of one hundred and fifteen males are conceived for every 100 females. Males are more likely to die before birth, therefore there are only one hundred and four males born for every one hundred females. Eighteen percent of boys die before their first …show more content…
In women both pair are X chromosomes, while men have a X and Y chromosomes. It is thought that if a female has a disease producing gene on one of the X chromosomes it may be cancelled out by a normal gene on the other X. If a man has the same bad gene on his X he lacks the potential protection of the matching gene. Estrogen and testosterone play a role in the gender gap. Estrogen raises good cholesterol (HDL) possibly explaining why heart disease typically begins ten years later in women. On the other hand, testosterone fuels diseases of the prostate benign and malignant. However, testosterone-prostate connection may not account for longevity gap, there are more deaths due to breast cancer. Social factors like work stress, and lack of social networks and support. “Death from overwork” is a recognized diagnosis in Japan and survivors may receive compensatory payments. It is said that people are good medicine. Strong interpersonal relationships and support networks reduce the risk of many problems. Two men should not walk down the street together unless one is carrying a ball. In general woman are in touch with their feelings and other women. Women have great ability to express their thoughts and emotions with each other. Twenty-eight percent of women report they can rely on friends for support compared to nine percent of men (New England Research Institute). Behavioral factors such as

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