Womens Rights In A Doll's House

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A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen is an illustration about an issue of women’s rights in Norway society during1878, during which women were expected to be undoubtedly obedient to their fathers, and husbands as well. The play is known as Ibsen’s strong desire about human being. It also a challenge to traditional rules about women’s rights. Women were normally sacrificed their lives for other people’s feeling, or devoted themselves for their husbands’ happiness. A good example about sacrificial role held by women is Nora’s friend, Mrs Linde. In order to support her helplessness mother and two brothers, she had chosen to abandon her true love, and married an old rich man. Especially, Nora Helmer, a main character in A Doll’s House, exemplifies a …show more content…
Nora is also a generous woman; however, there is a slight indication of her showing off money when she tells the Porter “There is a shilling. No, keep the change.” (Ibsen, 164.) Until her change, Nora’s personality can be considered childlike or immature. She spies on her husband when she “ takes a packet of macaroons from her pocket and eats one or two; then goes cautiously to her husband’s door and listens” (Ibsen, 164.). Nora’s childlike behavior is more obvious when Tovarld enters the scene. He calls her “ little skylark”, “little squirrel”, “Miss Sweet-Tooth”, “little spendthrift” (Ibsen, 164-166.) The use of pet names suggests that Nora is being treated like a little girl, and she happily accepts those childish epithets. Calling a wife by different pet names shows that Tovarld does not really respect his wife in a proper way. The fact that Nora allows this sort of treatment, give an impression that either she has low self-respect or is ignoring it all together. In addition, the maturity level of Nora also demonstrates readers that her husband-wife relationship is more like father-daughter relationship. She immaturely shuts her ears to unpleasant thoughts, places her hand on her mouth when Tovarld presents a hypothetical …show more content…
As the play progress, fear and panic become Nora’s primary responses to her surroundings. Her worries indicate Nora is more immature than her appearance in early. Ibsen is successful in triggering readers’ curiosity when he slowly unfolds Nora’s secrets through conversations between Nora and her friend, Mrs Linde, and source of her secret loan, Mr Krogstad as well. Nora shares Mrs Linde about a secret loan that she took in order to save Tovarld’s life. She considers telling her husband when “Yes-some day, perhaps, after many years, when I am no longer as nice-looking as I am now. Don’t laugh at me! I mean, of course, a time will come when Torvald is not as devoted to me, not quite so happy when I dance for him, and dress for him, and play with him” (Ibsen 172.) This shows that Nora has a sense of a true nature of her marriage. She knows that the foundation of marriage is built on an attraction of her beauty to him, and that he loves her because she looks good to him. Her day is filled with constant acts of subterfuge—some minor, like sneaking macaroons, and some of the utmost importance, like paying back a loan that saved her husband’s life. This reveals that Nora is not as naïve as she pretends to be, instead she is an insightful, intelligent woman. There is a new woman emerging in her thought. Moreover, Nora always

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