How Did Martin Luther King Jr And Women's Rights Change

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After the war, people became more aware that times were in the process of changing and that it was time to change the way of social normality. Women working during the war and when the men came back not all of them wanted to be back to the “normal” housewife anymore so this caused women’s rights protests and eventually the right for women to vote. This realization also caused people to finally start understanding that segregation is wrong so they decided to change that by doing protests. This caused for leaders like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to have more popularity because he was a voice for blacks and the bad problem of segregation in America. He helped millions have a voice during a dark time when America didn’t want to change its old …show more content…
He eventually also orchestrated some of the biggest protests as he got older. There were many protests in the 50’s, 60’s and in the 70’s.King had help lead some of the most revolutionary protests and rallies ever recorded. The Montgomery Bus Boycott occurred in 1955 and lasted all the way until 1956. The protest was against the public transit system in Montgomery, Alabama after Rosa Parks had been arrested for not moving out of her seat for a white passenger. This boycott of the transit and it caused a massive decrease in profit. The. black passengers that regularly used the public transit system stopped to help promote the boycott because they were angry. But, the White Citizens Group, which allegedly opposed racial segregation, firebombed King’s house because this boycott became so tense amongst everyone. Finally in 1956, the federal court decided that the laws in Alabama was unconstitutional to have a segregated transit system and changed the laws so everyone could use it. The Montgomery Bus Boycott finally ended in December of 1956, a little over a year later, when the Supreme Court upheld the district court's ruling. For this being his first and very impactful win, this made Martin Luther King one of its central leaders for civil rights. The Albany movement was created in November of 1961. It was a coalition formed to protest city segregation policies and laws. King wasn’t supposed to have a major role in this protest, he was just supposed to counsel the protesters for the day. Rather than the peaceful protest being undisturbed and left alone, the police did a mass arrest of the protestors including Dr. King. He refused to take the bail until the city changed its segregation policies. They ,are the changes and he left in jail after a few days. He left Albany,Georgia for a year then. When he had came back to Albany, the officials convicted him of leading the protest and they

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