Essay On Women Empowerment In The Great Gatsby

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Women 's Empowerment in Our Society Women are empowering to us all but they do not always get the credit they deserve. In the 1920s women become noticeably greater in the role of several things such as taking control of being able to vote. They also now can do as they please without their husbands consent. Women are growing stronger in themselves and others which also help how the society looks at us now. We still have a lot to improve on but we have grown and are not going to stop any time soon. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald illustrates that woman in the 1920s are important to how society shapes women into the current view of empowerment. Hearing about women working in the 1920 's is a big deal because this is when they started to begin their adventures of getting jobs. According to Women in the 1920s in North Carolina "By 1922 North Carolina was a leading manufacturing state, and the mills were hiring female floor workers. Cotton mills also employed a few nurses, teachers, …show more content…
Their minds were so brainwashed that they thought nothing was wrong with how the society was treating them, just how much they are worth is what they saw. Daisy was one of those people, in The Great Gatsby she said "I 'm glad it 's a girl. And I hope she 'll be a fool - that 's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool" (Fitzgerald, ch. 2). Which proves Daisy thinks things through and just wants the best for her daughter she still did not see how the world changes and improves in time. Daisy helped prove women were developing in the society because she knew how deceptive she was being. She also lead people on several times, that shows how smart she was which many other women were. Daisy knew what she needed to do to get what she wanted in life. Daisy empowering and an example of women also had a friend Jordan which showed dedication to women 's role in the 1920s by playing

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