Women's Rights Movement: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Decent Essays
Brittani Gregorich
Honors I
Mrs. Blomme
1 October 2014
Women’s Rights Movement As long as anyone can remember women have never been treated equally as men. Men have always believed they are the smarter, stronger, and generally more powerful. Women can work as hard as men but yet their pay is significantly lower. If you look back fifty years you would realize it was worse for women then versus the present day. Women are looked at as the person who should stay-at-home with the children, the person to do the cooking, and the person who should accomplish all the cleaning. Women did not have the right to vote even though women can today. It is still challenging for women to earn a position as a political leader. Women should be treated equally
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This conversation led them to begin to rebel for women, and one important woman in this group was Elizabeth Cady Stanton (The women’s rights movement: A timeline of significant events). Elizabeth was one of the first leaders of the women’s rights movement and she wrote the Declaration of Sentiments which was based on female equality. In July 1848 Elizabeth Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and many other women held the Seneca Falls Convention and this is where the Declaration of Sentiments began. This entire movement was where they fought for women to have the right to vote and the right where they promoted women’s rights, such as divorce. Elizabeth later called for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution which gave women the right to vote (Elizabeth Cady Stanton Biography). Elizabeth Stanton may at her time may have not understand what she was doing, but today she is recognized for all of her achievements because without her beginning this women other women wouldn’t have rebelled in all the years to come. Elizabeth Stanton later joined forces with Susan B. Anthony, another women fighting for women’s rights, and these two formed the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869 (Elizabeth Cady Stanton Biography). The National Woman Suffrage Association represented millions of women and was the parent organization of many other state groups supporting women’s rights (The National …show more content…
This act funds services for victims of rape and domestic violence, and it also allows women to seek civil rights remedies for gender related crimes ( The women’s rights movement: A timeline of significant events). This year happens to mark the 20th anniversary of the act being passed and a renewal has just been recently signed by President Barack Obama. Having this law being passed back in 1994 and still continuing has helped women when struggling with being a victim of rape, or domestic violence. This law has helped end violence against women because they are seen as fragile and weaker than most, so they are consider easier targets to the people who are committing the violence. Since The Violence against Women Act has been passed there has been a large shift in how the issue of violence against women is addressed (History of VAWA). While women can be independent and strong, it is very difficult to fight back for yourself and this act has helped many women who had been the victims of rape, or domestic violence. Before this law was passed women were left alone when something extreme happened to them, but now they have help and can have the other person be guilty

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