Women In The 1920s

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“... the New Women of the 1920s boldly asserted her right to dance, drink, smoke, and date...” (Zeitz). During the early 1900s, women were considered inferior to men. Women were expected to take care of the home, children, and religion. On the other hand, men took care of politics and business (Benner). Significant changes occurred in the 1920s for women regarding politics, labor, and appearance. A major event for women during the 1920s was the passing of the Nineteenth
Amendment. On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified; this gave women to right to vote (“19th Amendment”). Tennessee was the deciding factor on the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. Harry Burns cast the final vote that granted women voting rights.
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Flappers symbolized a “new freedom for women.” Most flappers defied the demeanor of women considering they began to smoke, drink alcohol, dress scandalously, and engage in sexual activities (Benner). Flappers were known to speak their mind. They were very bold compared to the modern woman (“The 1920s- Women”). Due to these changing behaviors in women, the divorce rate increased twofold in America the 1920s (“Women in the 1920s”).
Jazz music was popular during this era. Jazz Clubs played a significant part in the new behavior of women and flappers (“Changes in the American Culture and Society”). Jazz music inspired dances like the Charleston, the Black Bottom, the Shimmy, the Turkey Trot, the Cake Walk, the Bunny Hop and the Lindy Hop; flappers enjoyed participating in these types of dances (“Women in the 1920s”).
Not all women agreed with the flapper’s style. Some Americans felt that flappers were immoral and irresponsible. Women who resided in the Bible Belt, older women, poor women, and African American women typically did not adapt to the flappers way of life (“Changes in American Culture and Society”). Many suffragists shunned the flappers. Gaining the right to vote was a long process for them; therefore, they believed that flappers should be ineligible to vote (“Flappers and the Roaring

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