Women During World War 2 Essay

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During World War II the noncombatant British workforce consisted primarily of women, and the efforts allowed for British industries to meet the staggering demand for war resources. Through the Auxiliary Territorial Service, Women’s Royal Naval Service, and the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force women contributed to the war workforce effort through the many different positions they held while serving in the military. As woman had done during World War I, many worked in the high paying yet highly dangerous munitions factories as discussed in the upcoming chapter. In some cases women were met with hostility from men, such as Fire Watchers during the bombing raids. Some men believed women were unfit for the duty due to their believed inferiority of …show more content…
Such was the case of the “introduction of mixed-sex AA batteries in 1941”, as many of the job requirements that needed clothes that were supplied to men but not women. As the Auxiliary Territorial Service‘s form of dress was the official ATS jacket, a skirt, and a ”beret bearing the ATS badge.” A form of dress that would be well-suited for jobs often classified as feminine, such as secretarial duties, and nursing positions. However, when it came time for the ATS women to perform work often classified as masculine, such as mechanical, and outdoorsy positions, their ATS dress left much to be desired. Before it became accepted that women needed the same Battledress as men, the many women of the ATS groups often had to share the non-issued items and only use them when necessary. While men received well-fitting items the women received items that were often a wrong size or fit. Even with the constant headaches they faced, the women of the ATS still proved “that they could cope with all of the hardships of an isolated military post.” Following this mixed-sex batteries were universally employed with the AA Command, with their first war-actions reported in early September

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