Analysis Of A Temporary Matter By Jhumpa Lahiri

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Introduction: Jhumpa Lahiri deals really with generalizations in her “Interpreter of Maladies” in which many of her women characters depicted in diasporic situations. Her women characters, which are related to husband and wife roles within marriages, are sympathetic in description and they are found as stereotypical of Indian culture by the American readers. Married woman characters of Lahiri often deal with confusions of marriage such as; relation to cooking, working outside the home, and bearing children. As she generalize the Indian marital culture, her women According to Lahiri's generalizations of Indian marital culture, women are merely conscientious for cooking and doing household responsibilities, as well as becoming totally cultivated …show more content…
Shoba gives birth to a dead child; this tragic incident dramatically changes the lives of Shoba and Shukumar. Suddenly love and warmth evaporates from their lives. They become 'experts in avoiding each other in their three bed room house, spending as much times as possible on separate floors. Shukumar no longer looks forward to the weekends as Shoba spend hours on sofa with her colored pencils and her files. Shukumar would fear to break the silence. It had been a very long time since she had looked into his eyes and smiled, or whispered his name. She stops taking interest in the house under such state of affairs, crisis in their married life continued when a temporary matter in the form of a notice of electricity cut, informed about five days' power cut for one hour from 8 pm. This unexpected announcement provided them a chance to come closer. Unable to think anything in particular about spending an hour in darkness, Shoba turned nostalgic and her immigrant sensibility overpowered her when she said, "It is like India, sometimes the current disappears for hours at a stretch. I once had to attend an entire rice ceremony in the dark. The baby just cried and cried. It must have been so hot.'' Shoba further added being more nostalgic, “I remember during power failures at my grandmother's house, we all had to say something like a little poem, a joke or a fact about the world.” For them five nights turned into …show more content…
Das. Mr. & Mrs. Das family of five members came to Orissa for sightseeing from America. They engaged Mr. Kapasi as their guide, a learned man who due to some bad fortune ends up taking the profession of an interpreter with a doctor for Gujarati patients. Mrs. Das from the very beginning seemed to be an egocentric character, which hardly showed any affection towards her children and any love or soft feelings towards her husband, Mr. Das. They came to see Konark temple. They had complexes about their Indian origin and tried to look as much American as possible. Mrs. Das develops a deep interest in Mr. Kapasi's job as an interpreter of maladies. She even takes his address to send the photographs in which both of them are together. Mrs. Das gets attracted towards his professional acumen and she seeks a remedy from him for her secret pain as she was illegitimately impregnated by her husband's friend, a Punjabi who had come to stay with them for a few days. The guilt she committed in a moment's passion made her obsessed with it. For this she requested Kapasi : “Don't you see ? For eight years I haven't been able to express this to anybody, not to friends, certainly not to Raj. He doesn't even suspect it. He thinks I am still in love with him. Well, don’t you have anything to say? ..... About my secret and

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